7 Thai Restaurants in Manila

I’ve been to several trips in Bangkok, and craving for Thai food has always been an occasional feeling for me. I live in the city of Manila, and thankfully I have these seven Thai restaurants within my perimeter. So without further ado, here’s the list, in no particular order! Enjoy!

Jatujak

Jatujak

Upper Ground Floor, SM City San Lazaro, Santa Cruz, Manila
Mon-Thu : 10am – 8pm; Fri-Sun : 10am – 9pm
+63285671574
Jatujak’s Zomato Page

S R Thai Cuisine

S R Thai Cuisine

1229 V. Concepcion Street, Near UST Campus, Sampaloc, Manila
Mon-Sun : 9am – 9pm
+63287814715
S R Thai Cuisine’s Zomato Page

Doon Thai and Asian Fusion Cuisine

DOON Thai and Asian Fusion Cuisine

936 Dolores Street, Malate, Manila
Mon-Sun : 10am – 7pm
+63285624068; +63285224597
DOON Thai and Asian Fusion Cuisine’s Zomato Page

Soi

Soi

Ground Floor, Santa Monica Wing, Robinsons Place Manila, Ermita, Manila
Mon-Thu, Sun : 10am – 9pm; Fri-Sat : 10am – 10pm
+63285231189; +639997338388
Soi’s Zomato Page

Yue Lai Seafood and Hotpot Restaurant

Yue Lai Seafood and Hotpot Restaurant

1668 A. Mabini Street, Malate, Manila
Mon-Sun : 11am – 2am
+63284006395; +63284006491
Yue Lai Seafood and Hotpot Restaurant’s Zomato Page

Cha Tuk Chak

Cha Tuk Chak

Kaizen Building, Taft Avenue, Malate, Manila
Mon-Sun : 11am – 12midnight
Cha Tuk Chak’s Zomato Page

Siam Square Mokata

Siam Square Mokata

Xands Food X Bar, 562 J. Nakpil Street, Malate, Manila
Mon-Sun : 5pm – 3am
+639957733726
Siam Square Mokata’s Zomato Page

Enjoy Some Persian Food This Quarantine With Jamie’s Kebabs

The quarantine season has got everyone losing their usual routines, and that includes eating outside and/or ordering some takeaway. However, given the presence and the continuous operation of food delivery services all over Metro Manila during the quarantine period, it is still possible for us to crave for anything and get to eat them at the same time. To be honest, since I haven’t traveled anywhere this 2020, I miss the idea of traveling and eating some foreign food. I have always been a fan of Persian food, and I love kebabs! The last time I ate the best kebabs, hummus, and pita was back in Singapore last year when a colleague and I explored the food culture in Arab restaurants in Kampong Glam area.

Worry not, because upon searching for my specific food cravings here in Manila this quarantine season, I came across a newly-opened kebab delivery service, Jamie’s Kebabs. It’s very convenient that they have several options such as order and pick-up as well as delivery through foodpanda.

Jamie’s Kebabs is operated by the same owners of the Main Restaurant in Kapitolyo, Pasig City. I used to work in Ortigas area and live in Kapitolyo, and I’m surely missing this area where there’s a lot of restaurants to choose from! But for now, our best and safest option is food delivery. I don’t mind this option at all because we will surely get the same quality of food whether it’s dine in or takeaway.

I was able to try their beef and chicken kebab with buttered rice. I ditched eating rice a long time ago because of my new diet plan, but I just can’t resist trying out. It looked delicious in the menu and it did not fail me! The rice cheat day was worth it!

By the way, their kebab meals are also available with pita instead of rice.

They also sell other menu items such as pita bread and hummus, which are perfect for me since I’m counting calories. The hummus in particular reminded me of those Arab restaurants in Singapore, no kidding. I always pair hummus with a pita or wheat bread. Yummy! I’ve been looking for the best hummus all over the Metro for regular consumption, and thankfully I already found the place to buy such!

Next time I am planning to buy and try more items at Jamie’s Kebabs, and when the situation gets better, I would want to try some poutine at Main Restaurant Kapitolyo, something I’ve been wanting to do before.

Here are the details on how to order at Jamie’s Kebabs:

Overall, I could say that Jamie’s Kebabs is gonna be worth your money if you are planning to order some healthy comfort food this quarantine. We could always settle with the convenience brought by fastfoods, but personally I always want a healthy alternative as much as possible. The quality and taste of the food available at Jamie’s Kebabs is really good, so I encourage you to try them!

Let me know on Instagram (@wheressherlyn) if you also tried ordering from Jamie’s Kebabs! Happy eating!

EPISODE 0: Trailer (Grab Your Passport, We’re Leaving)

*Here is Grab Your Passport, We’re Leaving’s Spotify page.

Hello, podcast! Finally, finally! After three years of contemplating about it, I finally had the courage to start this podcast!
I am Sherlyn Mae Hernandez from Manila, Philippines, and welcome to my podcast. After deciding to quit social media to focus on my website (https://www.sherlynmaehernandez.com) and start this podcast, I have decided to just share here whatever I usually share on my Instagram account. That includes stories from my travels, my creative journey on becoming a better travel and street photographer (and a travel filmmaker in the future, hopefully!), and perhaps my two cents on any topic. Join me in this journey and I’m rooting for your support. Thanks, everyone! 🙂

So, what are some new things you planned to pursue this 2021?

I have been contemplating on two things since 2019: quitting Instagram and starting a podcast. Since putting up my Instagram travel account last 2017, it has so far gathered 17,000 followers and I found myself spending so much time in the platform, and I would admit, it’s starting to affect my mental health and my time management. This 2021, I decided to free myself of all the pressure that is Instagram and migrate all my content here in this website and start a podcast.

Introducing… *drum roll* Grab Your Passport, We’re Leaving!

grab your passport we're leaving

I hope you will support this journey and feel free to provide constructive comments on my content (because believe it or not, I’ve been teaching for 10 years already and I still have a lot to work on in terms of my communication skills).

Here are the other episodes of Grab Your Passport, We’re Leaving and here is the podcast’s Spotify page.

Grab Your Passport, We’re Leaving Episode 0: Trailer [TRANSCRIPT]

Hello, hello! Welcome to Sherlyn Mae the Podcast.

[Music]

I’m Sherlyn Mae Hernandez, an International Relations Professor based in Manila, Philippines, and also a passionate travel and street photographer.

[Music]

Most of the time, you will find me either on the platforms of the University lecture halls talking about wars, relationships of countries, terrorism, and all that stuff (because that’s my specialization), or doing research at the library. Otherwise, you might find me sitting in a coffee shop, writing travel articles, editing photos from my past trips, or interviewing some people about all things travel. In between, I’m traveling somewhere.

[Music]

Not gonna lie, but traveling and working anywhere and anytime I want sounds like a beautiful idea. But for now, I’m okay with squeezing mini-vacations within business trips and making the most out of all holidays and school breaks throughout the year. In which case, I go somewhere new to learn about history, art and culture, food, and existing human conditions. And oh, I have a thing with hotel architecture, street art, and local markets in particular!

[Music]

As an academic who always craves for knowledge, things like travel writing and photography are naturally close to my heart. I looooove and curating travel photos (check out my homepage to see!), but I wish people will not forget that cosmopolitanism and cultural awareness are still more dope than maintaining a perfect travel social media feed. This 2021, I made a decision to quit social media and focus on my website (www.sherlynmaehernandez.com) I will place a link to the description, and start this podcast.

[Music]

On this podcast, I’m about to tell you that in the grand scheme of things, traveling may not be beautiful 100% of the time, but it’s always just a matter of perspective (just like other things in this world). Here, I will be sharing lots of travel stories, both the beautiful and ugly ones, along with travel hacks and tips. I will also be sharing my creative journey towards becoming a better travel and street photographer (and hopefully filmmaker in the future), and perhaps my two cents on any topic.

[Music]

I hope you will join me in this journey and you will support my podcast and other work. That’s it for now, and I’ll see you in my next episodes. Bye!

[Music]

My 2021 Reading List (Daily Blog #5)

Daaaamn, 2021 is fast-approaching! As I have mentioning in my old social media accounts and in my previous daily blogs here, one of my goals for 2021 is to quit social media for good. For one, I want to look at another perspective on my own creativity without consuming a lot of inspirations. Second, I want to substitute mindless social media scrolling (and consuming potential fake news and non-essential life updates from people I don’t actually know irl) with reading actual books.

During the last day of classes last school year, one of the last words of advice I left to my students is to read a goddamn book instead of looking up for quick answers over the internet for your questions about life, the society, and the world. “Each one of us, no matter how qualified we are, has an equal privilege to post any kind of information on social media and the internet. On the other hand, authors were able to publish books for a reason. Plus, books underwent rigorous reviews, and chances are, the information we would consume from them will be far worth it than the information we consume from social media. So, class, read a goddamn book.”

Sometimes I just need to take my own advice. I believe 2020 was the year when I read the least number of books. Before I start feeding you with all my pandemic-related dramas and excuses to justify my lack of reading actual books this 2020, let’s just move forward because I am very excited to share my 2021 Reading List!

My 2021 Reading List: Self-Help, Cultures, International Relations, and the Classics

I purchased an Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 4 because holding an actual book with a clip-on reading light at night felt very inconvenient to me. However, I wasn’t able to read a lot with my Kindle so far since I purchased it. I still find myself reading stuff with the pdf reader of my laptop so that I can easily transfer some thoughts and ideas to the presentation slides I’ll be showing to class.

I did not have a proper reading goal.

I’ve had a lot of times I went out to have some coffee by myself but I always forget to bring the damn Kindle.

In short, 2020 has been my least ambitious year of all, reading-wise.

Stumbling upon Bill Gates’ Goodreads author profile has given me access to all the books he has read and reviewed. Bill Gates was known to read a lot of books and practically the God of efficiency and time management. I fell in love and I got more inspired to read more this year.

I am an academic, so therefore reading books has been part of my daily life. I have to read a lot to have something to teach. I have to read a lot so that I know what studies have already been conducted and what studies can I initiate. I have to read a lot so keep up with new information about my discipline. A huge part of my job requires reading and analyzing things I read.

Without further ado, and in no particular order, here are the 30 books I vow to read this coming 2021. Since I teach International Relations and Southeast Asian Studies, a lot of these books are about international politics, cultures, and wars. Also, since I am a very ‘artsy’ person and I am forever a ‘work-in-progress’, I included several self-help and creativity-themed books. Please allow me to paste the synopsis of the books I got from Goodreads. I promise I’ll try my best to write my own synopsis and review of these books after I finish reading them.

1. The Finnish Way: Finding Courage, Wellness, and Happiness Through the Power of Sisu by Katja Pantzar

MY 2021 READING LIST:

An engaging and practical guided tour of the simple and nature-inspired ways that Finns stay happy and healthy–including the powerful concept of sisu, or everyday courage

Forget hygge–it’s time to blow out the candles and get out into the world! Journalist Katja Pantzar did just that, taking the huge leap to move to the remote Nordic country of Finland. What she discovered there transformed her body, mind and spirit. In this engaging and practical guide, she shows readers how to embrace the “keep it simple and sensible” daily practices that make Finns one of the happiest populations in the world, year after year.

Topics include:

*Movement as medicine How walking, biking and swimming every day are good for what ails us–and best done outside the confines of a gym
*Forest therapy Why there’s no substitute for getting out into nature on a regular basis
*Healthy eating What the Nordic diet can teach us all about feeding body, mind and soul
*The gift of sisu Why Finns embrace a special form of courage, grit and determination as a national virtue – and how anyone can dig deeper to survive and thrive through tough times.

If you’ve ever wondered if there’s a better, simpler way to find happiness and good health, look no further. The Finns have a word for that, and this empowering book shows us how to achieve it.

2. Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis by Jared Diamond

MY 2021 READING LIST:

In his international bestsellers Guns, Germs and Steel and Collapse, Jared Diamond transformed our understanding of what makes civilizations rise and fall. Now, in his third book in this monumental trilogy, he reveals how successful nations recover from crises while adopting selective changes — a coping mechanism more commonly associated with individuals recovering from personal crises.

Diamond compares how six countries have survived recent upheavals — ranging from the forced opening of Japan by U.S. Commodore Perry’s fleet, to the Soviet Union’s attack on Finland, to a murderous coup or countercoup in Chile and Indonesia, to the transformations of Germany and Australia after World War Two. Because Diamond has lived and spoken the language in five of these six countries, he can present gut-wrenching histories experienced firsthand. These nations coped, to varying degrees, through mechanisms such as acknowledgment of responsibility, painfully honest self-appraisal, and learning from models of other nations. Looking to the future, Diamond examines whether the United States, Japan, and the whole world are successfully coping with the grave crises they currently face. Can we learn from lessons of the past?

Adding a psychological dimension to the in-depth history, geography, biology, and anthropology that mark all of Diamond’s books, Upheaval reveals factors influencing how both whole nations and individual people can respond to big challenges. The result is a book epic in scope, but also his most personal book yet.

3. The Jakarta Method: Washington’s Anticommunist Crusade and the Mass Murder Program that Shaped our World by Vincent Bevins

MY 2021 READING LIST:

The hidden story of the wanton slaughter — in Indonesia, Latin America, and around the world — backed by the United States.
In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. This was one of the most important turning points of the twentieth century, eliminating the largest communist party outside China and the Soviet Union and inspiring copycat terror programs in faraway countries like Brazil and Chile. But these events remain widely overlooked, precisely because the CIA’s secret interventions were so successful.

In this bold and comprehensive new history, Vincent Bevins builds on his incisive reporting for the Washington Post, using recently declassified documents, archival research and eye-witness testimony collected across twelve countries to reveal a shocking legacy that spans the globe. For decades, it’s been believed that parts of the developing world passed peacefully into the U.S.-led capitalist system. The Jakarta Method demonstrates that the brutal extermination of unarmed leftists was a fundamental part of Washington’s final triumph in the Cold War.

4. Burmese Days by George Orwell

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Set in the days of the Empire, with the British ruling in Burma, Orwell’s book describes corruption and imperial bigotry. Flory, a white timber merchant, befriends Dr Veraswami, a black enthusiast for the Empire, whose downfall can only be prevented by membership at an all-white club.

5. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond

MY 2021 READING LIST:

“Diamond has written a book of remarkable scope … one of the most important and readable works on the human past published in recent years.”

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a national bestseller: the global account of the rise of civilization that is also a stunning refutation of ideas of human development based on race.

In this “artful, informative, and delightful” (William H. McNeill, New York Review of Books) book, Jared Diamond convincingly argues that geographical and environmental factors shaped the modern world. Societies that had a head start in food production advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage, and then developed writing, technology, government, and organized religion—as well as nasty germs and potent weapons of war—and adventured on sea and land to conquer and decimate preliterate cultures. A major advance in our understanding of human societies, Guns, Germs, and Steel chronicles the way that the modern world came to be and stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, the Rhone-Poulenc Prize, and the Commonwealth Club of California’s Gold Medal

6. The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century by Thant Myint-U

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Precariously positioned between China and India, Burma’s population has suffered dictatorship, natural disaster, and the dark legacies of colonial rule. But when decades of military dictatorship finally ended and internationally beloved Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi emerged from long years of house arrest, hopes soared. World leaders such as Barack Obama ushered in waves of international support. Progress seemed inevitable.

As historian, former diplomat, and presidential advisor, Thant Myint-U saw the cracks forming. In this insider’s diagnosis of a country at a breaking point, he dissects how a singularly predatory economic system, fast-rising inequality, disintegrating state institutions, the impact of new social media, the rise of China next door, climate change, and deep-seated feelings around race, religion, and national identity all came together to challenge the incipient democracy. Interracial violence soared and a horrific exodus of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees fixed international attention. Myint-U explains how and why this happened, and details an unsettling prognosis for the future.

Burma is today a fragile stage for nearly all the world’s problems. Are democracy and an economy that genuinely serves all its people possible in Burma? In clear and urgent prose, Myint-U explores this question—a concern not just for the Burmese but for the rest of the world—warning of the possible collapse of this nation of 55 million while suggesting a fresh agenda for change.

7. Worldmaking After Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination by Adom Getachew

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Decolonization revolutionized the international order during the twentieth century. Yet standard histories that present the end of colonialism as an inevitable transition from a world of empires to one of nations—a world in which self-determination was synonymous with nation-building—obscure just how radical this change was. Drawing on the political thought of anticolonial intellectuals and statesmen such as Nnamdi Azikiwe, W.E.B Du Bois, George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah, Eric Williams, Michael Manley, and Julius Nyerere, this important new account of decolonization reveals the full extent of their unprecedented ambition to remake not only nations but the world.

Adom Getachew shows that African, African American, and Caribbean anticolonial nationalists were not solely or even primarily nation-builders. Responding to the experience of racialized sovereign inequality, dramatized by interwar Ethiopia and Liberia, Black Atlantic thinkers and politicians challenged international racial hierarchy and articulated alternative visions of worldmaking. Seeking to create an egalitarian postimperial world, they attempted to transcend legal, political, and economic hierarchies by securing a right to self-determination within the newly founded United Nations, constituting regional federations in Africa and the Caribbean, and creating the New International Economic Order.

Using archival sources from Barbados, Trinidad, Ghana, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom, Worldmaking after Empire recasts the history of decolonization, reconsiders the failure of anticolonial nationalism, and offers a new perspective on debates about today’s international order.

8. Animal Farm by George Orwell

MY 2021 READING LIST:

A farm is taken over by its overworked, mistreated animals. With flaming idealism and stirring slogans, they set out to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality. Thus the stage is set for one of the most telling satiric fables ever penned –a razor-edged fairy tale for grown-ups that records the evolution from revolution against tyranny to a totalitarianism just as terrible.
When Animal Farm was first published, Stalinist Russia was seen as its target. Today it is devastatingly clear that wherever and whenever freedom is attacked, under whatever banner, the cutting clarity and savage comedy of George Orwell’s masterpiece have a meaning and message still ferociously fresh.A farm is taken over by its overworked, mistreated animals. With flaming idealism and stirring slogans, they set out to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality. Thus the stage is set for one of the most telling satiric fables ever penned –a razor-edged fairy tale for grown-ups that records the evolution from revolution against tyranny to a totalitarianism just as terrible.
When Animal Farm was first published, Stalinist Russia was seen as its target. Today it is devastatingly clear that wherever and whenever freedom is attacked, under whatever banner, the cutting clarity and savage comedy of George Orwell’s masterpiece have a meaning and message still ferociously fresh.

9. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

MY 2021 READING LIST:

100,000 years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens.

How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations and human rights; to trust money, books and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come?

In Sapiens, Dr Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come?

Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power … and our future.

10. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Brave New World is a dystopian novel by English author Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Largely set in a futuristic World State, inhabited by genetically modified citizens and an intelligence-based social hierarchy, the novel anticipates huge scientific advancements in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation and classical conditioning that are combined to make a dystopian society which is challenged by only a single individual: the story’s protagonist.

11. Our Bodies, Their Battlefields by Christina Lamb

MY 2021 READING LIST:

From Christina Lamb, the coauthor of the bestselling I Am Malala and an award-winning journalist—an essential, groundbreaking examination of how women experience war.

In Our Bodies, Their Battlefields, longtime intrepid war correspondent Christina Lamb makes us witness to the lives of women in wartime. An award-winning war correspondent for twenty-five years (she’s never had a female editor) Lamb reports two wars—the “bang-bang” war and the story of how the people behind the lines live and survive. At the same time, since men usually act as the fighters, women are rarely interviewed about their experience of wartime, other than as grieving widows and mothers, though their experience is markedly different from that of the men involved in battle.

Lamb chronicles extraordinary tragedy and challenges in the lives of women in wartime. And none is more devastating than the increase of the use of rape as a weapon of war. Visiting warzones including the Congo, Rwanda, Nigeria, Bosnia, and Iraq, and spending time with the Rohingya fleeing Myanmar, she records the harrowing stories of survivors, from Yazidi girls kept as sex slaves by ISIS fighters and the beekeeper risking his life to rescue them; to the thousands of schoolgirls abducted across northern Nigeria by Boko Haram, to the Congolese gynecologist who stitches up more rape victims than anyone on earth. Told as a journey, and structured by country, Our Bodies, Their Battlefields gives these women voice.

We have made significant progress in international women’s rights, but across the world women are victimized by wartime atrocities that are rarely recorded, much less punished. The first ever prosecution for war rape was in 1997 and there have been remarkably few convictions since, as if rape doesn’t matter in the reckoning of war, only killing. Some courageous women in countries around the world are taking things in their own hands, hunting down the war criminals themselves, trying to trap them through Facebook.

In this profoundly important book, Christina Lamb shines a light on some of the darkest parts of the human experience—so that we might find a new way forward. Our Bodies, Their Battlefields is as inspiring and empowering is as it is urgent, a clarion call for necessary change.

12. The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: A History of Settler-Colonial Conquest and Resistance, 1917-2017 by Rashid Khalidi

MY 2021 READING LIST:

A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history.

In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous people who would not easily accept their own displacement. He warned of the perils ahead, ending his note, “in the name of God, let Palestine be left alone.” Thus Rashid Khalidi, al-Khalidi’s great-great-nephew, begins this sweeping history, the first general account of the conflict told from an explicitly Palestinian perspective.

Drawing on a wealth of untapped archival materials and the reports of generations of family members – mayors, judges, scholars, diplomats, and journalists – The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine upends accepted interpretations of the conflict, which tend, at best, to describe a tragic clash between two peoples with claims to the same territory. Instead, Khalidi traces a hundred years of colonial war on the Palestinians, waged first by the Zionist movement and then Israel, but backed by Britain and the United States, the great powers of the age. He highlights the key episodes in this colonial campaign, from the 1917 Balfour Declaration to the destruction of Palestine in 1948, from Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon to the endless and futile peace process.

Original, authoritative, and important, The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine is not a chronicle of victimization, nor does it whitewash the mistakes of Palestinian leaders or deny the emergence of national movements on both sides. In reevaluating the forces arrayed against the Palestinians, it offers an illuminating new view of a conflict that continues to this day.

13. Migration in the Time of Revolution: China, Indonesia, and the Cold War by Taomo Zhou

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Migration in the Time of Revolution examines how two of the world’s most populous countries interacted between 1945 and 1967, when the concept of citizenship was contested, political loyalty was in question, identity was fluid, and the boundaries of political mobilization were blurred. Taomo Zhou asks probing questions of this important period in the histories of the People’s Republic of China and Indonesia. What was it like to be a youth in search of an ancestral homeland that one had never set foot in, or an economic refugee whose expertise in private business became undesirable in one’s new home in the socialist state? What ideological beliefs or practical calculations motivated individuals to commit to one particular nationality while forsaking another?

As Zhou demonstrates, the answers to such questions about ordinary migrants are crucial to a deeper understanding of diplomatic relations between the two countries. Through newly declassified documents from the Chinese Foreign Ministry Archives and oral history interviews, Migration in the Time of Revolution argues that migration and the political activism of the ethnic Chinese in Indonesia were important historical forces in the making of governmental relations between Beijing and Jakarta after World War II. Zhou highlights the agency and autonomy of individuals whose life experiences were shaped by but also helped shape the trajectory of bilateral diplomacy. These ethnic Chinese migrants and settlers were, Zhou contends, not passively acted upon but actively responding to the developing events of the Cold War. This book bridges the fields of diplomatic history and migration studies by reconstructing the Cold War in Asia as social processes from the ground up. 

14. They Will Have to Die Now: Mosul and the Fall of the Caliphate by James Verini

MY 2021 READING LIST:

A searing narrative of the Battle of Mosul, described by the Pentagon as “the most significant urban combat since World War II.”

In this masterpiece of war journalism based on months of frontline reporting, National Magazine Award winner James Verini describes the climactic battle in the struggle against the Islamic State. Focusing on two brothers from Mosul and their families, a charismatic Iraqi major who marched north from Baghdad to seize the city with his troops, rowdy Kurdish militiamen, and a hard-bitten American sergeant, Verini describes a war for the soul of a country, a war over and for history.

Seeing the battle in a larger, centuries-long sweep, he connects the bloody-minded philosophy of the Islamic State with the ancient Assyrians who founded Mosul. He also confronts the ways that the American invasion of Iraq not only deformed that country, but also changed America like no conflict since Vietnam.

15. Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

MY 2021 READING LIST:

In this must-read book for anyone striving to succeed, pioneering psychologist Angela Duckworth shows parents, educators, students, and business people both seasoned and new that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent but a focused persistence called grit.

Why do some people succeed and others fail? Sharing new insights from her landmark research on grit, Angela Duckworth explains why talent is hardly a guarantor of success. Rather, other factors can be even more crucial such as identifying our passions and following through on our commitments.

Drawing on her own powerful story as the daughter of a scientist who frequently bemoaned her lack of smarts, Duckworth describes her winding path through teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience, which led to the hypothesis that what really drives success is not genius, but a special blend of passion and long-term perseverance. As a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Duckworth created her own character lab and set out to test her theory.

Here, she takes readers into the field to visit teachers working in some of the toughest schools, cadets struggling through their first days at West Point, and young finalists in the National Spelling Bee. She also mines fascinating insights from history and shows what can be gleaned from modern experiments in peak performance. Finally, she shares what she’s learned from interviewing dozens of high achievers; from JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon to the cartoon editor of The New Yorker to Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll.

Winningly personal, insightful, and even life-changing, Grit is a book about what goes through your head when you fall down, and how that not talent or luck makes all the difference.

16. A Great Place To Have A War: America in Laos and the Birth of a Military CIA by Joshua Kurlantzick

MY 2021 READING LIST:

The untold story of how America’s secret war in Laos in the 1960s transformed the CIA from a loose collection of spies into a military operation and a key player in American foreign policy.

In 1960, President Eisenhower was focused on Laos, a tiny Southeast Asian nation few Americans had ever heard of. Washington feared the country would fall to communism, triggering a domino effect in the rest of Southeast Asia. So in January 1961, Eisenhower approved the CIA’s Operation Momentum, a plan to create a proxy army of ethnic Hmong to fight communist forces in Laos. While remaining largely hidden from the American public and most of Congress, Momentum became the largest CIA paramilitary operation in the history of the United States. The brutal war, which continued under Presidents Kennedy and Nixon, lasted nearly two decades, killed one-tenth of Laos’s total population, left thousands of unexploded bombs in the ground, and changed the nature of the CIA forever.

Joshua Kurlantzick gives us the definitive account of the Laos war and its central characters, including the four key people who led the operation—the CIA operative who came up with the idea, the Hmong general who led the proxy army in the field, the paramilitary specialist who trained the Hmong, and the State Department careerist who took control over the war as it grew.

The Laos war created a CIA that fights with real soldiers and weapons as much as it gathers secrets. Laos became a template for CIA proxy wars all over the world, from Central America in the 1980s to today’s war on terrorism, where the CIA has taken control with little oversight. Based on extensive interviews and CIA records only recently declassified, A Great Place to Have a War is a riveting, thought-provoking look at how Operation Momentum changed American foreign policy forever.

17. Power to the People: How Open Technological Innovation is Arming Tomorrow’s Terrorists by Audrey Kurth Cronin

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Never have so many possessed the means to be so lethal. The diffusion of modern technology (robotics, cyber weapons, 3-D printing, autonomous systems, and artificial intelligence) to ordinary people has given them access to weapons of mass violence previously monopolized by the state. In recent years, states have attempted to stem the flow of such weapons to individuals and non-state groups, but their efforts are failing.

As Audrey Kurth Cronin explains in Power to the People, what we are seeing now is an exacerbation of an age-old trend. Over the centuries, the most surprising developments in warfare have occurred because of advances in technologies combined with changes in who can use them. Indeed, accessible innovations in destructive force have long driven new patterns of political violence. When Nobel invented dynamite and Kalashnikov designed the AK-47, each inadvertently spurred terrorist and insurgent movements that killed millions and upended the international system.

That history illuminates our own situation, in which emerging technologies are altering society and redistributing power. The twenty-first century “sharing economy” has already disrupted every institution, including the armed forces. New “open” technologies are transforming access to the means of violence. Just as importantly, higher-order functions that previously had been exclusively under state military control – mass mobilization, force projection, and systems integration – are being harnessed by non-state actors. Cronin closes by focusing on how to respond so that we both preserve the benefits of emerging technologies yet reduce the risks. Power, in the form of lethal technology, is flowing to the people, but the same technologies that empower can imperil global security – unless we act strategically.

18. Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement by Ming-sho Ho

MY 2021 READING LIST:

In 2014, the Sunflower Movement in Taiwan grabbed international attention as citizen protesters demanded the Taiwan government withdraw its free-trade agreement with China. In that same year, in Hong Kong, the Umbrella Movement sustained 79 days of demonstrations, protests that demanded genuine universal suffrage in electing Hong Kong’s chief executive. It too, became an international incident before it collapsed. Both of these student-led movements featured large-scale and intense participation and had deep and far-reaching consequences. But how did two massive and disruptive protests take place in culturally conservative societies? And how did the two “occupy”-style protests against Chinese influences on local politics arrive at such strikingly divergent results?

Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven aims to make sense of the origins, processes, and outcomes of these eventful protests in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Ming-sho Ho compares the dynamics of the two movements, from the existing networks of activists that preceded protest, to the perceived threats that ignited the movements, to the government strategies with which they contended, and to the nature of their coordination. Moreover, he contextualizes these protests in a period of global prominence for student, occupy, and anti-globalization protests and situates them within social movement studies.

19. The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un by Anna Fifield

MY 2021 READING LIST:

The behind-the-scenes story of the rise and reign of the world’s strangest and most elusive tyrant, Kim Jong Un, by the journalist with the best connections and insights into the bizarrely dangerous world of North Korea.

Since his birth in 1984, Kim Jong Un has been swaddled in myth and propaganda, from the plainly silly–he could supposedly drive a car at the age of three–to the grimly bloody stories of family members who perished at his command.
Anna Fifield reconstructs Kim’s past and present with exclusive access to sources near him and brings her unique understanding to explain the dynastic mission of the Kim family in North Korea. The archaic notion of despotic family rule matches the almost medieval hardship the country has suffered under the Kims. Few people thought that a young, untested, unhealthy, Swiss-educated basketball fanatic could hold together a country that should have fallen apart years ago. But Kim Jong Un has not just survived, he has thrived, abetted by the approval of Donald Trump and diplomacy’s weirdest bromance.

Skeptical yet insightful, Fifield creates a captivating portrait of the oddest and most secretive political regime in the world–one that is isolated yet internationally relevant, bankrupt yet in possession of nuclear weapons–and its ruler, the self-proclaimed Beloved and Respected Leader, Kim Jong Un.

20. Likewar: The Weaponization of Social Media by P.W. Singer and Emerson T. Brooking

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Social media has been weaponized, as state hackers and rogue terrorists have seized upon Twitter and Facebook to create chaos and destruction. This urgent report is required reading, from defense expert P.W. Singer and Council on Foreign Relations fellow Emerson Brooking.

21. Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport

MY 2021 READING LIST:

Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It’s the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world.

In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives.

Digital minimalists are all around us. They’re the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don’t feel overwhelmed by it. They don’t experience “fear of missing out” because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction.

Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don’t go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions.

Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day “digital declutter” process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control.

Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.

22. Cuba Libre: A 500-Year Quest for Independence by Philip Brenner and Peter Eisner

MY 2021 READING LIST:

This timely book provides a balanced and deeply knowledgeable introduction to Cuba since Christopher Columbus’s first arrival in 1492. With decades of experience studying and reporting on the island, Philip Brenner and Peter Eisner provide an incisive overview for all readers seeking to go beyond stereotypes in their exploration of Cuba’s politics, economy, and culture. As Cuba and the United States open their doors to each other, Cuba Libre gives travelers, policy makers, businesspeople, students, and those with an interest in world affairs an opportunity to understand Cuba from a Cuban perspective; to appreciate how Cubans’ quest for independence and sovereignty animates their spirit and shapes their worldview and even their identity. In a world ever more closely linked, Cuba Libre provides a compelling model for US citizens and policy makers to empathize with viewpoints far from their own experiences.

23. The Muslim Brotherhood and the West: A History of Enmity and Engagement by Martyn Frampton

MY 2021 READING LIST:

The Muslim Brotherhood and the West is the first comprehensive history of the relationship between the world’s largest Islamist movement and the Western powers that have dominated the Middle East for the past century: Britain and the United States.

In the decades since the Brotherhood emerged in Egypt in the 1920s, the movement’s notion of “the West” has remained central to its worldview and a key driver of its behavior. From its founding, the Brotherhood stood opposed to the British Empire and Western cultural influence more broadly. As British power gave way to American, the Brotherhood’s leaders, committed to a vision of more authentic Islamic societies, oscillated between anxiety or paranoia about the West and the need to engage with it. Western officials, for their part, struggled to understand the Brotherhood, unsure whether to shun the movement as one of dangerous “fanatics” or to embrace it as a moderate and inevitable part of the region’s political scene. Too often, diplomats failed to view the movement on its own terms, preferring to impose their own external agendas and obsessions.

Martyn Frampton reveals the history of this complex and charged relationship down to the eve of the Arab Spring. Drawing on extensive archival research in London and Washington and the Brotherhood’s writings in Arabic and English, he provides the most authoritative assessment to date of a relationship that is both vital in itself and crucial to navigating one of the world’s most turbulent regions.

24. The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66 by Geoffrey B. Robinson

MY 2021 READING LIST:

The Killing Season explores one of the largest and swiftest, yet least examined, instances of mass killing and incarceration in the twentieth century–the shocking antileftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965-66, leaving some five hundred thousand people dead and more than a million others in detention.


An expert in modern Indonesian history, genocide, and human rights, Geoffrey Robinson sets out to account for this violence and to end the troubling silence surrounding it. In doing so, he sheds new light on broad and enduring historical questions. How do we account for instances of systematic mass killing and detention? Why are some of these crimes remembered and punished, while others are forgotten? What are the social and political ramifications of such acts and such silence?

Challenging conventional narratives of the mass violence of 1965-66 as arising spontaneously from religious and social conflicts, Robinson argues convincingly that it was instead the product of a deliberate campaign, led by the Indonesian Army. He also details the critical role played by the United States, Britain, and other major powers in facilitating mass murder and incarceration. Robinson concludes by probing the disturbing long-term consequences of the violence for millions of survivors and Indonesian society as a whole.

Based on a rich body of primary and secondary sources, The Killing Season is the definitive account of a pivotal period in Indonesian history. It also makes a powerful contribution to wider debates about the dynamics and legacies of mass killing, incarceration, and genocide. 

25. A Frozen Hell: The Russo-Finnish Winter War of 1939-1940 by William R. Trotter

MY 2021 READING LIST:

In 1939, tiny Finland waged war – the kind of war that spawns legends – against the mighty Soviet Union, and yet their epic struggle has been largely ignored. Guerrillas on skis, heroic single-handed attacks on tanks, unfathomable endurance, and the charismatic leadership of one of this century’s true military geniuses – these are the elements of both the Finnish victory and a gripping tale of war.

26. Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin Kleon

MY 2021 READING LIST:

You don’t need to be a genius, you just need to be yourself. That’s the message from Austin Kleon, a young writer and artist who knows that creativity is everywhere, creativity is for everyone. A manifesto for the digital age, Steal Like an Artist is a guide whose positive message, graphic look and illustrations, exercises, and examples will put readers directly in touch with their artistic side.

27. Keep Going: 10 Ways to Stay Creative in Good Times and Bad by Austin Kleon

MY 2021 READING LIST:

In his previous books Steal Like an Artist and Show Your Work!, both New York Times bestsellers, Austin Kleon gave readers the keys to unlock their creativity and showed them how to become known. Now he offers his most inspiring work yet, with ten simple rules for how to stay creative, focused, and true to yourself—for life.

The creative life is not a linear journey to a finish line, it’s a loop—so find a daily routine, because today is the only day that matters. Disconnect from the world to connect with yourself—sometimes you just have to switch into airplane mode. Keep Going celebrates getting outdoors and taking a walk (as director Ingmar Bergman told his daughter, ”The demons hate fresh air”). Pay attention, and especially pay attention to what you pay attention to. Worry less about getting things done, and more about the worth of what you’re doing. Instead of focusing on making your mark, work to leave things better than you found them.

Keep Going and its timeless, practical, and ethical principles are for anyone trying to sustain a meaningful and productive life.

28. Show Your Work!: 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered by Austin Kleon

MY 2021 READING LIST:

In his New York Times bestseller Steal Like an Artist, Austin Kleon showed readers how to unlock their creativity by “stealing” from the community of other movers and shakers. Now, in an even more forward-thinking and necessary book, he shows how to take that critical next step on a creative journey—getting known.

Show Your Work! is about why generosity trumps genius. It’s about getting findable, about using the network instead of wasting time “networking.” It’s not self-promotion, it’s self-discovery—let others into your process, then let them steal from you. Filled with illustrations, quotes, stories, and examples, Show Your Work! offers ten transformative rules for being open, generous, brave, productive.

In chapters such as You Don’t Have to Be a GeniusShare Something Small Every Day; and Stick Around, Kleon creates a user’s manual for embracing the communal nature of creativity— what he calls the “ecology of talent.” From broader life lessons about work (you can’t find your voice if you don’t use it) to the etiquette of sharing—and the dangers of oversharing—to the practicalities of Internet life (build a good domain name; give credit when credit is due), it’s an inspiring manifesto for succeeding as any kind of artist or entrepreneur in the digital age.

29. Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James Clear

MY 2021 READING LIST:

No matter your goals, Atomic Habits offers a proven framework for improving–every day. James Clear, one of the world’s leading experts on habit formation, reveals practical strategies that will teach you exactly how to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that lead to remarkable results.

If you’re having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn’t you. The problem is your system. Bad habits repeat themselves again and again not because you don’t want to change, but because you have the wrong system for change. You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems. Here, you’ll get a proven system that can take you to new heights.

Clear is known for his ability to distill complex topics into simple behaviors that can be easily applied to daily life and work. Here, he draws on the most proven ideas from biology, psychology, and neuroscience to create an easy-to-understand guide for making good habits inevitable and bad habits impossible. Along the way, readers will be inspired and entertained with true stories from Olympic gold medalists, award-winning artists, business leaders, life-saving physicians, and star comedians who have used the science of small habits to master their craft and vault to the top of their field.

Learn how to:
*  make time for new habits (even when life gets crazy);
*  overcome a lack of motivation and willpower;
*  design your environment to make success easier;
*  get back on track when you fall off course;
…and much more.

Atomic Habits will reshape the way you think about progress and success, and give you the tools and strategies you need to transform your habits–whether you are a team looking to win a championship, an organization hoping to redefine an industry, or simply an individual who wishes to quit smoking, lose weight, reduce stress, or achieve any other goal.

30. Loving Pablo, Hating Escobar by Virginia Vallejo

MY 2021 READING LIST:

A revealing memoir of Colombian television journalist Virginia Vallejo’s affair with the “King of Cocaine,” notorious Medellín drug lord, Pablo Escobar. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz.

At 33, Virginia Vallejo was media elite. A renowned anchorwoman and socialite, and a model who appeared on magazine covers worldwide, Vallejo was the darling of Colombia’s most powerful politicians and billionaires. Meeting Pablo Escobar in 1983, and becoming his mistress for many years, she witnessed the rise of a drug empire that was characterized by Escobar’s far-reaching political corruption, his extraordinary wealth, and a network of violent crime that lasted until his death in 1993.
     In this highly personal and insightful story, Vallejo characterizes the duality of Escobar’s charm and charisma as a benefactor to the people of Colombia, and the repulsion of his criminal actions as a tyrannical terrorist and enemy of many world leaders. Told from the present day perspective, and reflecting on her cooperation with the US Department of Justice, in 2006, as she testified against high-ranking Colombian ministers on trial for conspiracy and murder, Vallejo offers a compelling work of intimate reflection and critical journalism–a unique perspective on the Colombian drug wars and the endlessly fascinating figure, Pablo Escobar.

My 2021 Reading List: Wish Me Luck!

Feel free to send me an email at sherlynmaehernandez@gmail.com if you want to have copies of these books! Also, feel free to share your own reading list at the comments section. Good luck to us and let’s have a productive 2021 ahead! 🙂

#1: How Instagram Could Ruin Our Creative Process

Is it just me, or Instagram could really ruin someone’s creative process?

instagram
instagram
instagram

This photo I’ve taken in Myanmar somehow made it to the Picture Perfect section of Manila Bulletin, a national newspaper in the Philippines, and, along with my other photos, to a photo exhibit at the University of the Philippines Asian Center (featuring grad school classmates who were supportive of my NatGeo dreamz lol yay!).

This was in 2016, the time when I still haven’t thought of setting up an Instagram account for my travel and street photos (this account was born June 2017, y’all) and when I was still a Master’s student in UP with a small government salary who’s broke enough to be able to NOT afford putting up my own website domain. Now that I’m thinking about it, I never needed Instagram or any online presence to be able to land these opportunities four years ago.

Not gonna lie, but I think working on my own website and creating this Instagram account has landed me to so many opportunities, making all my (self-funded) passion projects sustainable and allowing me to continually learn more and improve my work. But through time, I feel like social media has been disrupting my creative process.

At some point, some of us became slaves to vanity metrics (you know, likes, comments, compliments, features, name it). I would post stuff that ‘Instagram would like’ instead of ‘what I like’. Instead of getting inspiration, browsing other works on Instagram makes me very hypercritical of my work (in other words, I self-reject my works even before I post them). And boy, there were times I even let Instagram dictate the places I’ll travel to.

But at the end of the day, I think all that matters is whether the creative process itself still makes you feel alive. And to be fair, this year has made me pause and reflect to figure out a lot of things, including my creative pursuits.

Nothing. I’m just venting while planning my creative journey in 2021. How’s it going, everyone?

The Best Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) problem affected a lot of upcoming international events, including the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics. Looking at the bright side, this means that, if you are planning to travel to Japan to watch the games, you have more time to plan ahead for the trip.

Given that, here is a full list of the top 3 hotels near each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics venue. I provided the hotels’ address, nearest landmarks (in case you want to go sightseeing), distance from the venues, and links to booking sites. Please exercise information validation of the data I presented here.

HOTELS NEAR OLYMPIC STADIUM

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
The National Stadium was used as the main stadium for the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games, and is currently being rebuilt as a brand new stadium for the Tokyo 2020 Games. The Opening and Closing ceremonies of the Tokyo 2020 Games will be held here along with athletics events and football matches. After the 2020 Games are over, the stadium will be used for sporting and cultural events. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 10-1 Kasumigaokamachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Football, Athletics

Mitsui Garden Hotel Jingugaien Tokyo Premier

  • ADDRESS: 11-3, Kasumigaokamachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shinjuku Gyoen Park (910m)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO OLYMPIC STADIUM: 100m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Sunroute Plaza Shinjuku

  • ADDRESS: 2-3-1 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku , Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building (900m)
  • DISTANCE FROM OLYMPIC STADIUM: 1.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Keio Plaza Hotel Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: 2-2-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building (250m)
  • DISTANCE FROM OLYMPIC STADIUM: 2.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTEL NEAR TOKYO METROPOLITAN GYMNASIUM

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium is one of the legacy venues of the 1964 Olympic Games. It served as the main arena for Tokyo 1964, hosting the gymnastics events and water polo, which was held in the venue’s indoor pool. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 17-1, 1chome, Sendagaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Table Tennis

Shibuya Tokyo REI Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 1-24-10 Shibuya-ku , Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (1.81km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO METROPOLITAN GYMNASIUM: 2.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Shibuya Excel Hotel Tokyu

  • ADDRESS: 1-12-2 Dougenzaka, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (1.98km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO METROPOLITAN GYMNASIUM: 3.0km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

JR East Hotel Mets Shibuya

  • ADDRESS: 3-1 Udagawa-cho, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (1.47km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO METROPOLITAN GYMNASIUM: 3.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR YOYOGI NATONAL GYMNASIUM

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
Yoyogi National Stadium was constructed to stage the aquatics and basketball competitions for the Tokyo 1964 Games. The arena is famous for its suspension roof design, and has earned a glowing international reputation. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1-1, 2chome, Jinnan, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Handball, Badminton, Wheelchair Rugby

Shibuya Tobu Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 3-1 Udagawa-cho, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (1.47km)
  • DISTANCE FROM YOYOGI NATIONAL GYMNASIUM: 300m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Unizo Tokyo Shibuya

  • ADDRESS: 4-3 Udagawacho, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (1.54km)
  • DISTANCE FROM YOYOGI NATIONAL GYMNASIUM: 400m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Shibuya Creston Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 10-8 Kamiyamacho, Shibuya-ku, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (1.52km)
  • DISTANCE FROM YOYOGI NATIONAL GYMNASIUM: 500m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR NIPPON BUDOKAN

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
The Nippon Budokan is known as the spiritual home of Japanese martial arts – especially judo. At the 1964 Games, judo made its debut as an Olympic sport, with competitions being held here. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 2-3, Kitanomarukoen, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Karate, Judo

Hotel Grand Palace

  • ADDRESS: 1-1-1 Iidabashi Chiyodaku , Akihabara, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shinjuku Gyen Park (3.75km)
  • DISTANCE FROM NIPPON BUDOKAN: 650m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Metropolitan Edmont

  • ADDRESS: 3-10-8 Iidabashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Dome, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shinjuku Gyen Park (3.79km)
  • DISTANCE FROM NIPPON BUDOKAN: 1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Monterey Hanzomon

  • ADDRESS: 23-1 Ichibancho Chiyoda-Ku, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shinjuku Gyen Park (2.83km)
  • DISTANCE FROM NIPPON BUDOKAN: 1.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR TOKYO INTERNATIONAL FORUM

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
The Tokyo International Forum is a multi-purpose exhibition centre comprised of eight main halls of various sizes, exhibition spaces and other facilities. The structure features swooping curves of steel and glass, with an exterior design resembling an elongated boat. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 5-1, 3chome, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Weightlifting, Powerlifting

IMPERIAL HOTEL TOKYO

  • ADDRESS: 1-1, Uchisaiwai-Cho 1-Chome Chiyoda-Ku, Ginza, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (1.44km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO INTERNATIONAL FORUM: 750m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

OAKWOOD PREMIER TOKYO

  • ADDRESS: 1-8-2 Marunouchi, Chiyoda, Tokyo Station, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (2.01km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO INTERNATIONAL FORUM: 850m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Shangri-La Hotel Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: Marunouchi Trust Tower Main, 1-8-3 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Station, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (2.02km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO INTERNATIONAL FORUM: 1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR KOKUGIKAN ARENA

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
Kokugikan Arena is the spiritual home of the Japanese national sport of sumo wrestling. The interior is designed in a bowl shape to allow spectators to easily view the sumo bouts in the centre of the auditorium from wherever they are seated. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 3-28, 1chome, Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Boxing

Dai-Ichi Hotel Ryokogu

  • ADDRESS: 1-6-1 Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Ryougoku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Asakusa Shrine (1.88km)
  • DISTANCE FROM KOKUGIKAN ARENA: 650m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Pearl Hotel Ryogoku

  • ADDRESS: 1-2-24,Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Ryougoku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Asakusa Shrine (2.16km)
  • DISTANCE FROM KOKUGIKAN ARENA: 110m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Ryogoku View Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 2-19-1 Ryogoku, Sumida-ku, Ryougoku, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Asakusa Shrine (2.24km)
  • DISTANCE FROM KOKUGIKAN ARENA: 200m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR EQUESTRIAN PARK

Hotels Near Each Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics Venue
This 1964 Olympic legacy venue hosted the equestrian competitions at the Tokyo 1964 Games. The park currently serves as a main centre for the promotion of horse riding and equestrian competitions. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1-1, 2chome, Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Equestrian

Tokyu Stay Yoga

  • ADDRESS: 4-4-1 Yoga, Setagaya-Ku, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (8.13km)
  • DISTANCE FROM EQUESTRIAN PARK: 1.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

The B Sangenjaya

  • ADDRESS: 2-17-9 Taishido, Setagaya-Ku, Meguro, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (4.34km)
  • DISTANCE FROM EQUESTRIAN PARK: 3.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Yadokan

  • ADDRESS: Setagaya-ku Daita 3 Chome−58-1, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Meiji Shrine (4.15km)
  • DISTANCE FROM EQUESTRIAN PARK: 3.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR MUSASHINO FOREST SPORT PLAZA

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Musashino Forest Sport Plaza is close to Tokyo Stadium and will serve as a multi-purpose sports venue. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 290-11, Nishimachi, Chofu-shi, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Badminton, Modern Pentathlon, Wheelchair Basketball

Hotel Asahi Grandeur Fuchu

  • ADDRESS: Momijigaoka 3-40-9, Fuchu, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM MUSASHINO FOREST SPORT PLAZA: 1.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Urban Hotel Twins Chofu

  • ADDRESS: Fuda 1-47-4, Chofu, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM MUSASHINO FOREST SPORT PLAZA: 2.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Marroad Inn Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: 1-4-1 Wakamatsucho, Fuchu, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM MUSASHINO FOREST SPORT PLAZA: 2.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR TOKYO STADIUM (AJINOMOTO STADIUM)

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Tokyo Stadium is a multi-purpose venue that is used for a variety of activities, and is particularly well known as a leading venue for football matches. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 376-3, Nishimachi, Chofu-shi, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Modern Pentathlon, Football, Rugby

Toyoko Inn Fuchu-Nambu-sen Minami-tama Ekimae

  • ADDRESS: 999 Omaru, Inagi-shi, Inagi, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO STADIUM: 5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel Livemax Kite Fuchu

  • ADDRESS: Fuchu, Sakaechou 3-15-9, Fuchu, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO STADIUM: 6.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel Daiwa Kokubunji

  • ADDRESS: 3-16-7 3F, Minami-cho, Kokubunji, Kokubunji, Musashino, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO STADIUM: 6.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR MUSASHINONOMORI PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Musashinonomori Park will be used as the start line for the cycling road race. The park is surrounded by the wide expanse of Musashino Forest, and both riders and spectators will be able to enjoy lush greenery and beautiful views. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 3chome, Asahicho, Fuchu-shi Nishimachi, Chofu-shi 5-6chome, Osawa, Mitaka-shi
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Cycling Road

Hotel Route Inn Tokyo Asagaya

  • ADDRESS: 5-35-14 Narita Higashi, Suginami-ku, Suginami, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building (5.39km)
  • DISTANCE FROM MUSHASHINONOMORI PARK: 10km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Mitaka City Hotel

  • ADDRESS: Shimorenjaku 3-21-5, Mitaka, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM MUSHASHINONOMORI PARK: 5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Keio Plaza Hotel Tama

  • ADDRESS: Shimoren1-43, Ochiai, Tama City, Tama, Chofu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM MUSHASHINONOMORI PARK: 12.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR ARIAKE ARENA

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Ariake Arena is a new venue under construction in the northern part of Tokyo’s Ariake district. After the Tokyo 2020 Games, the arena will become a new sporting and cultural centre with a seating capacity for up to 15,000 spectators. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 11, 1chome, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Volleyball, Wheelchair Basketball

Hotel JAL City Tokyo Toyosu

  • ADDRESS: 6-4 Toyosu, Koto, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (2.38km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE ARENA: 900m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Monday Toyosu

  • ADDRESS: 1-2-11 Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo JAPAN, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (3.23km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE ARENA: 1.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Daiwa Roynet Hotel Tokyo Ariake

  • ADDRESS: 3-7-3 Ariake, Koto, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (3.87km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE ARENA: 1.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR ARIAKE GYMNASTICS CENTRE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This temporary venue will be located in the northern part of Tokyo’s Ariake district. Following the Tokyo 2020 Games, a sporting arena with a 12,000 seating capacity is scheduled for construction on this site. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 10-1, 1chome, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Artistic Gymnastics, Trampoline Gymnastics, Rhythmic Gymnastics, Boccia

Tokyo Bay Ariake Washington Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 3-7-11 Ariake, Koto-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (4.04km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE GYMNASTICS CENTRE: 1.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Sotetsu Grand Fresa Tokyo-Bay Ariake

  • ADDRESS: 3-6-6 Ariake, Koto-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (3.93km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE GYMNASTICS CENTRE: 1.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Trusty Tokyo Bayside

  • ADDRESS: 3-1-15 Ariake, Koto-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (4.24km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE GYMNASTICS CENTRE: 2.1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR ARIAKE URBAN SPORTS PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This course has been constructed in the Ariake district, which is located in the stunning waterfront area close to the Athletes’ Village and the Big Sight venue, which will house the IBC and the MPC. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 7, 1chome, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Skateboarding, Cycling BMX Freestyle Cycling, BMX Racing

Hotel Fukuracia Harumi

  • ADDRESS: 3-8-1 Harumi, Chuo-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (1.32km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE URBAN SPORTS PARK: 2.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Grand Nikko Tokyo Daiba

  • ADDRESS: 2-6-1 daiba minato-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (4.37km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE URBAN SPORTS PARK: 2.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hilton Tokyo Odaiba

  • ADDRESS: 1-9-1 Daiba, Minato-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (4.23km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE URBAN SPORTS PARK: 2.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR ARIAKE TENNIS PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Ariake Tennis Park is one of the main tennis facilities in the country, featuring the Ariake Coliseum centre court and fully equipped with show courts, indoor courts and outdoor courts. Phoot and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 2-22, 2chome, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Tennis, Wheelchair Tennis

Dai-ichi Hotel Tokyo Seafort

  • ADDRESS: 2-3-15 Higashi-Shinagawa, Shinagawa-Ku, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (3.82km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE TENNIS PARK: 9.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Toyoko Inn Tokyo Shinagawa Konan-guchi Tennozu Isle

  • ADDRESS: 2-2-35, Higashi-shinagawa, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (4.06km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE TENNIS PARK: 9.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel Gracery Tamachi

  • ADDRESS: 3-8-1 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Shinbashi, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (1.71km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ARIAKE TENNIS PARK: 7.1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR ODAIBA MARINE PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The Odaiba Marine Park offers visitors a rich harmony of natural greenery, the ocean and stunning views of Tokyo’s futuristic cityscape including the nearby Rainbow Bridge. During the Tokyo 2020 Games, a temporary venue will be set up in the park. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1chome, Daiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Triathlon, Marathon Swimming

The Strings by InterContinental Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: Minato-ku, Konan 2-16-1 Shinagawa East One Tower 26-32 Floor, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (3.45km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ODAIBA MARINE PARK: 4.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Tokyo Marriott Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 4-7-36, kitashinagawa,Shinagawa-ku, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (4.16km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ODAIBA MARINE PARK: 5.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Shinagawa Prince Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 4-10-30 Takanawa, Minato-ku, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (3.52km)
  • DISTANCE FROM ODAIBA MARINE PARK: 5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR SHIOKAZE PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Shiokaze Park affords exquisite views of Tokyo’s iconic Rainbow Bridge and the beautiful Tokyo Bay. During the Tokyo 2020 Games, a temporary venue will be set up in the park for the beach volleyball events. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1 Higashiyashio, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Beach Volleyball

Hearton Hotel Higashi Shinagawa

  • ADDRESS: 4-13-27 Higashi Shinagawa, Shinagawa Ku, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (5.38km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SHIOKAZE PARK: 7.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

InterContinental Tokyo Bay

  • ADDRESS: Minato-ku Kaigan 1-16-2, Shinbashi, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (1.48km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SHIOKAZE PARK: 7.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Super Hotel Shinagawa Aomono-yokocho

  • ADDRESS: 3-22-27, Higashishinagawa, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (5.05km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SHIOKAZE PARK: 7.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR AOMI URBAN SPORTS PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The Aomi Urban Sports Park is a temporary venue in the waterfront Aomi district, and is also situated conveniently close to the Athletes’ Village. With views across the iconic Tokyo Bay, this venue will serve as a symbol of our efforts to engage the youth of the world at the Tokyo 2020 Games. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1, 1chome, Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: 3×3 Basketball, Sport Climbing, Football 5-a-side

Park Hotel Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: 3-22-27, HigashishinShiodome Media Tower, 1-7-1, Higashi Shimbashi, Minato-ku , Ginza, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (1.2km)
  • DISTANCE FROM AOMI URBAN SPORTS PARK: 6.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTEL MYSTAYS Haneda

  • ADDRESS: 5-1-13 Haneda, Ota-ku, Haneda International Airport, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (11.95km)
  • DISTANCE FROM AOMI URBAN SPORTS PARK: 14.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Tokyu Stay Ginza

  • ADDRESS: 4-10-5, Ginza, Chuo-ku, Ginza, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (740m)
  • DISTANCE FROM AOMI URBAN SPORTS PARK: 6.8km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR OI HOCKEY STADIUM

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The Oi Hockey Stadium has been constructed in the Oi Pier Ocean Park. Plans are underway for the venue to be used for hockey and as a multi-purpose sports facility after the 2020 Games. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1-19, 4chome, Yashio, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 2-1, 1chome, Tokai, Ota-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Hockey

HOTEL MYSTAYS PREMIER Hamamatsucho

  • ADDRESS: 1-8-5 Hamamatshucho, Minato-ku, Shinbashi, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (990m)
  • DISTANCE FROM OI HOCKEY STADIUM: 8.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

ANA InterContinental Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: Minato-ku, Akasaka 1-12-33, Akasaka, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (1.16km)
  • DISTANCE FROM OI HOCKEY STADIUM: 9.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

FOCUS KURAMAE

  • ADDRESS: 4-21-2 Kuramae, Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Asakusa Shrine (1.34km)
  • DISTANCE FROM OI HOCKEY STADIUM: 14.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR SEA FOREST CROSS-COUNTRY COURSE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This area of reclaimed land affords superb views of Tokyo Bay and Tokyo’s dramatic cityscape. A temporary course has been constructed here for the equestrian cross country competition during the 2020 Games. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1-19, 4chome, Yashio, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 2-1, 1chome, Tokai, Ota-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Equestrian

Richmond Hotel Premier Tokyo Oshiage

  • ADDRESS: 1-10-3 Oshiage, Sumida-ku, Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Asakusa Shrine (1.56km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SEA FOREST CROSS-COUNTRY COURSE: 19km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Day Nice Hotel Tokyo

  • ADDRESS: 2-1-1 Kiba, Koto-ku, Koto, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (2.87km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SEA FOREST CROSS-COUNTRY COURSE: 12.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Sotetsu Fresa Inn Nihombashi-Kayabacho

  • ADDRESS: 1-3-10 Nihombashi Kayabacho, Chuo-ku,, Tokyo Station, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsujiki Outer Market (2.03km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SEA FOREST CROSS-COUNTRY COURSE: 14.1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR SEA FOREST WATERWAY

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The rowing and canoe course are on this waterfront site, which is also located close to central Tokyo. Following the 2020 Games, the course will be used for international rowing and canoe competitions, and will become one of the premier locations in Asia for water sports. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 3chome, Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Canoe Sprint, Rowing

HOTEL MYSTAYS PREMIER Omori

  • ADDRESS: 6-19-3, Minami-Oi, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (7.65km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SEA FOREST WATERWAY: 10.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Tmark City Hotel Tokyo Omori

  • ADDRESS: 1-2-10, Omori-honcho, Ota-ku Tokyo 143-0011 Japan, Haneda International Airport, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (7.97km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SEA FOREST WATERWAY: 9.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Goethe Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 3-29-12 Minamiooi, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tokyo Tower (7.89km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SEA FOREST WATERWAY: 10.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR KASAI CANOE SLALOM CENTRE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The canoe slalom course will be the first man-made course in Japan and will be newly constructed on land adjoining the Kasai Rinkai Park. After the 2020 Games, the facility will be used for a wide range of water sports and leisure activities. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1-1, 6chome, Rinkaicho, Edogawa-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Canoe Slalom

Tokyo Bay Maihama Hotel First Resort

  • ADDRESS: 1-6 Maihama, Urayasu-shi, Chiba, Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (9.96km)
  • DISTANCE FROM KASAI CANOE SLALOM CENTER: 4.8km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Family Resort Fifty’s For Maihama

  • ADDRESS: 4-1-3 Minamikasai, Edogawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (9.35km)
  • DISTANCE FROM KASAI CANOE SLALOM CENTER: 2.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Nice Inn Hotel Maihama Tokyo Bay

  • ADDRESS: 2-25-25,Higashino,Urayasu-city, Chiba, Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (11.53km)
  • DISTANCE FROM KASAI CANOE SLALOM CENTER: 5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR YUMENOSHIMA PARK ARCHERY FIELD

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Yumenoshima Park Archery Field has been constructed in the park area of the Dream Island site. Following the 2020 Games, the facility will house archery competitions and be used for a wide range of other activities. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1-4, 2chome, Yumenoshima, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Archery

Best Western Tokyo Nishikasai Grande

  • ADDRESS: 6-19-18, Nishikasai, Edogawa Ku, Tokyo, Japan, Edogawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (8.1km)
  • DISTANCE FROM YUMENOSHIMA PARK ARCHERY FIELD: 5.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Lumiere Nishikasai

  • ADDRESS: 6-20-3,Nishikasai,Edogawa-ku, Edogawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (8.19km)
  • DISTANCE FROM YUMENOSHIMA PARK ARCHERY FIELD: 5.8km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Best Western Tokyo Nishikasai

  • ADDRESS: 6-17-9 Nishikasai, Edogawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (8.09km)
  • DISTANCE FROM YUMENOSHIMA PARK ARCHERY FIELD: 5.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR TOKYO AQUATICS CENTRE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Tokyo Aquatics Centre has been newly constructed in the Tatsumi-no-Mori Seaside Park. Following the 2020 Games, the venue will host domestic and international competitions. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 2-1, 2chome, Tatsumi, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Artistic Swimming, Swimming, Diving

APA Hotel Tokyo-Shiomi-Ekimae

  • ADDRESS: 2-8-6,Shiomi,Koto-ku, Koto, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (4.43km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO AQUATICS CENTRE: 1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel East 21 Tokyo (Okura Hotels & Resorts)

  • ADDRESS: 2-8-6,Shiomi,Ko6-3-3 Toyo, Koto-Ku, Koto, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (4.13km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO AQUATICS CENTRE: 3.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Keisei Richmond Hotel Tokyo Monzennakacho

  • ADDRESS: 2-8-9 Monzannakacho, Koto, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (2.52km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TOKYO AQUATICS CENTRE: 3.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR TATSUMI WATER POLO CENTRE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This iconic and spacious venue was designed in 1990 to serve as the main facility for swimming and other water sports in the Tokyo area. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 8-10, 2chome, Tatsumi, Koto-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Water Polo

JR-EAST HOTEL METS TOKYO BAY SHINKIBA

  • ADDRESS: 4 Nishi, Kita-Ichi-J1-6-1 Shinkiba, Koto-ku, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (5.38km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TATSUMI WATER POLO CENTRE: 1.1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel Route-Inn Grand Tokyo Toyocho

  • ADDRESS: 2-3-12, Toyo, Koto-ku, Koto, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (4.18km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TATSUMI WATER POLO CENTRE: 3.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Livemax Toyosu-Ekimae

  • ADDRESS: 5-5-34 Toyosu, Koto, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tsukiji Outer Market (2.68km)
  • DISTANCE FROM TATSUMI WATER POLO CENTRE: 2.8km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR SAPPORO ODORI PARK

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Sapporo Odori Park has been designated as the venue for the Olympic Marathon and Olympic Race Walking events, and overlay work will be done in preparation for the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. Located in the centre of Sapporo City, the park is approximately 1.5km long and covers an area of about 7.8ha. With beautiful flowerbeds, green grass and trees, the park is a popular event venue and attracts many tourists and citizens all year round. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: Odorinishi, Chuo-ku, Sapporo City, Hokkaido
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Athletics

Sapporo Grand Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 4 Nishi, Kita-Ichi-Jo Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, Sapporo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sapporo TV Tower (500m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAPPORO ODORI PARK: 450m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel WBF Sapporo Chuo

  • ADDRESS: 1-2-2, Minami-Nijonishi, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Sapporo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sapporo TV Tower (280m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAPPORO ODORI PARK: 400m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Cross Hotel Sapporo

  • ADDRESS: 2-23, Nishi, Kita 2 jo, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Sapporo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sapporo TV Tower (410m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAPPORO ODORI PARK: 450m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR MAKUHARI MESSE HALL

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This large-scale convention centre spans some 210,000 square metres and consists of three major zones – the International Exhibition Hall, the International Conference Hall, and the Makuhari Event Hall. The centre is located in Chiba City, Chiba Prefecture. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 2-1, Nakase, Mihama-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba
  • SPORTS TO BE PLAYED HERE: Fencing, Taekwondo, Wrestling, Goalball, Sitting Volleyball

Hotel Springs Makuhari

  • ADDRESS: Mihama-ku Hibino 1-11, Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Mitsui Outlet Park Makuhari (330m)
  • DISTANCE FROM MAKUHARI MESSE HALL: 850m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel New Otani Makuhari

  • ADDRESS: 2-120-3, Hibino, Mihama-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, JAPAN, Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Mitsui Outlet Park Makuhari (540m)
  • DISTANCE FROM MAKUHARI MESSE HALL: 550m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel The Manhattan

  • ADDRESS: 2-10-1 Hibino, Mihama-ku, Chiba-shi, Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Mitsui Outlet Park Makuhari (190m)
  • DISTANCE FROM MAKUHARI MESSE HALL: 700m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR TSURIGASAKI SURFING BEACH

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Surfing will be making its debut at the Tokyo 2020 Games, and competitions will be held here. Boasting world-class waves, this beach attracts lots of surfers each year. The beach is located in Ichinomiya town on Chiba Prefecture’s Pacific coastline. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 6961-1, Torami, Ichinomiya-machi, Chosei-gun, Chiba
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Surfing

Ichinomiya Seaside Otsuka Hotel Torami

  • ADDRESS: 10000 Ichinomiya, Ichinomiya-machi, Chosei-gun, Ichinomiya, Onjuku, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM TSURIGASAKI SURFING BEACH: 3.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Casual Resort COFF Ichinomiya

  • ADDRESS: Ichinomiya, Onjuku, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM TSURIGASAKI SURFING BEACH: 3.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Shirako New Seaside Hotel

HOTEL NEAR SAITAMA SUPER ARENA

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This facility, located in Saitama City, is one of Japan’s largest multipurpose venues, hosting sporting competitions, concerts, conferences and many other events. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 8, Shintoshin, Chuo-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Basketball

Super Hotel Saitama Omiya

  • ADDRESS: 1-12-6 Sakuragicho, Omiya-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Omiya sonic City (290m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAITAMA SUPER ARENA: 1.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Toyoko Inn Saitama Shin-toshin

  • ADDRESS: 4-262-1, Kishiki-cho Omiya-ku Saitama-shi, Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Keyaki Hiroba (310m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAITAMA SUPER ARENA: 350m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel Metropolitan Saitama-Shintoshin

  • ADDRESS: 11-1, Shintoshin, Chuo-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Keyaki Hiroba (40m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAITAMA SUPER ARENA: 53m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR ASAKA SHOOTING RANGE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The Asaka Shooting Range hosted the shooting competitions for the Tokyo 1964 Games. During the 2020 Games, an Olympic-standard temporary facility will be constructed at this site. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 4, 9chome, Oizumigakuencho, Nerima-ku, Tokyo
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Shooting

Hotel Livemax Saitama Asaka Ekimae

  • ADDRESS: 2-6-9 Honcho, Asaka-shi, Asaka, Asaka, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM ASAKA SHOOTING RANGE: 13.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Toyoko Inn Tokyo Seibu Ikebukuro-sen Higashi-kurume-eki Nishi-guchi

  • ADDRESS: 1-4-8 Honcho, Higashi-kurume-shi, Higashikurume, Musashino, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM ASAKA SHOOTING RANGE: 6.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Toyoko Inn Wako-shi Ekimae

  • ADDRESS: 1-10-7 Maruyamadai, Wako-shi, Wako, Wako, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM ASAKA SHOOTING RANGE: 3.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR KASUMIGASEKI COUNTRY CLUB

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This golf course extends out across the verdant Musashino Hills. The club has a history spanning over 80 years, and the course was designed by golf architects who understood the importance of preserving and passing on the traditions of golf to future generations. The club is located in Kawagoe City, Saitama Prefecture. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 3398, Kasahata, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Golf

Shinsayama Hotel

  • ADDRESS: Sayama, Sayama, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM KASUMIGASEKI COUNTRY CLUB: 6.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Kawagoe Prince Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 1-22, Shintomi-cho, Kawagoe-city, Kawagoe, Kawagoe, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM KASUMIGASEKI COUNTRY CLUB: 9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Kawagoe Yuyu Land Hotel Sankou

  • ADDRESS: Kawagoe, Kawagoe, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM KASUMIGASEKI COUNTRY CLUB: 8.8km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR ENOSHIMA YACHT HARBOR

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The Enoshima Yacht Harbour is located in Fujisawa City, Kanagawa Prefecture and was constructed for use at the 1964 Games, making it yet another 1964 Olympic legacy venue. This venue is Japan’s first ever harbour capable of hosting water sport competitions. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 12-2, 1chome, Enoshima, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Sailing

Iwamotoro Honkan

  • ADDRESS: 2-2-7 Enoshima, Fujisawa-shi, Enoshima, Kamakura, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM ENOSHIMA YACHT HARBOR: 500m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Shonan Enoshima Oryori Ryokan Ebisuya (Katase/Enoshima)

  • ADDRESS: 1-4-16 Enoshima, Fujisawa-shi, Enoshima, Kamakura, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM ENOSHIMA YACHT HARBOR: 350m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Kinokuniya Ryokan

  • ADDRESS: Enoshima, Kamakura, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM ENOSHIMA YACHT HARBOR: 1.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR IZU VELODROME

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This indoor venue located in Izu City, Shizuoka Prefecture, houses a 250m wooden cycling track that fully complies with the technical standards required by the Union Cycliste Internationale, the world governing body for cycling. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1826, Ono, Izu-shi, Shizuoka
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Cycling Track

New Hakkeien Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 211 Nagaoka, Izunokunishi, Izunokuni, Izu, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Narukawa Shoten (310m)
  • DISTANCE FROM IZU MTB VELODROME: 10.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Konastay Izu Nagaoka

  • ADDRESS: Kona 307, Izunokuni, Izu, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sairinji Temple (160m)
  • DISTANCE FROM IZU MTB VELODROME: 11.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Izu Marriott Hotel Shuzenji

  • ADDRESS: 1529 Odaira, Izu-shi, Shuzenji, Izu, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Chikurinnokomichi (2.08km)
  • DISTANCE FROM IZU MTB VELODROME: 15km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR IZU MTB COURSE

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This off-road course, located in Izu City, Shizuoka Prefecture, measures 4,100m in length with elevations of up to 150m. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1826, Ono, Izu-shi, Shizuoka
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Cycling Mountain Bike

Izu Village Heso Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 195-2, Takyo, Izunokuni city, Shizuoka 410-2315, Japan, Izunokuni, Izu, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Oohito Shrine (1.82km)
  • DISTANCE FROM IZU MTB COURSE: 8.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Ohito Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 1178 Yoshida, Izunokuni-shi, Izunokuni, Izu, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Oohito Shrine (210m)
  • DISTANCE FROM IZU MTB COURSE: 9.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Winery Hill

  • ADDRESS: 1434 Shimoshiraiwa, Izu-shi, Shuzenji, Izu, Japann
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Bandai Jozo Brewery (1.71km)
  • DISTANCE FROM IZU MTB COURSE: 7.8km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR FUJI INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Fuji International Speedway is the closest circuit to the Greater Tokyo Area. In addition to being the most recent international motor race course, the venue also boasts the most up-to-date facilities for race personnel and members of the media, and is an excellent venue to host such a major international event. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 694 Nakahinata Oyama-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Cycling Road

Fuji Marriott Hotel Lake Yamanaka

  • ADDRESS: 1256-1 Hirano, Yamanakako, Yamanakako, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM FUJI INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY: 14.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Mifuji

  • ADDRESS: Minamitoru Hirano 531, Yamanakako, Yamanakako, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM FUJI INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY: 11.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Route Inn Gotemba

  • ADDRESS: 628-16 Kawashimata, Gotenba-city, Gotemba, Gotemba, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Mannendo Honten (140m)
  • DISTANCE FROM FUJI INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY: 7.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR FUKUSHIMA AZUMA BASEBALL STADIUM

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Located in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture, the stadium is part of the Azuma Sports Park, which is divided into four recreational spaces: the Sports Area, the Nature Area, the Family Area and the History Area. Baseball and softball have been included in the Tokyo 2020 Games as new events and some games will be hosted here. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1, Kamikotoba, Sabara, Fukushima-shi, Fukushima
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Baseball/Softball

Chisun Inn Fukushima Nishi IC

  • ADDRESS: 20-1 Kineshimizu, Narikawa, Fukushima, Fukushima, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Fruit Line (3.28km)
  • DISTANCE FROM FUKUSHIMA AZUMA BASEBALL STADIUM: 6.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Grand Park Hotel Excel Fukushima Ebisu

  • ADDRESS: 10-6 Soneda-cho, Fukushima, Fukushima, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Iwaya Kannon (1.13km)
  • DISTANCE FROM FUKUSHIMA AZUMA BASEBALL STADIUM: 10.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR YOKOHAMA BASEBALL STADIUM

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Located in Yokohama Park, Kanagawa Prefecture, the Yokohama Stadium is Japan’s first ever multi-purpose stadium. It also serves as home to one of Japan’s professional baseball teams. Baseball and softball have been included in the 2020 Olympic Programme as new events, and the Yokohama Stadium will host several games. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: Yokohamakoen, Naka-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Baseball/Softball

Toyoko Inn Yokohama Stadium-mae No.1

  • ADDRESS: 205-1, Yamashita-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, Yokohama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Yokohama Chinatown (400m)
  • DISTANCE FROM YOKOHAMA BASEBALL STADIUM: 97m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Super Hotel Yokohama Kannai

  • ADDRESS: 195-1 Yamashitacho Nakaku, Yokohama, Yokohama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Yokohama Chinatown (350m)
  • DISTANCE FROM YOKOHAMA BASEBALL STADIUM: 140m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Daiwa Roynet Hotel Yokohama-Koen

  • ADDRESS: 204 Yamashita-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, Yokohama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Yokohama Chinatown (370m)
  • DISTANCE FROM YOKOHAMA BASEBALL STADIUM: 160m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR SAPPORO DOME

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The Sapporo Dome is home to one Japanese professional football team and one baseball team. This all-weather dome-shaped stadium is located in Sapporo City in Japan’s northernmost island of Hokkaido. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 1, Hitsujigaoka, Toyohira-ku, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Football

Kiyaza City Sapporo

  • ADDRESS: Shiroishiku Nangodori Kita 1-2-15, Sapporo, Sapporo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sapporo TV Tower (3.77km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAPPORO DOME: 4.1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Emisia Sapporo

  • ADDRESS: 5-5-25 Atsubetsuchuo 2-jo, Atsubetsu-Ku, Sapporo, Sapporo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Moerenuma Park (9.78km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAPPORO DOME: 6.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Mercure Hotel Sapporo

  • ADDRESS: Minami 4-jo Nishi 2-chome Chuo-ku , Sapporo, Sapporo, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Tanukikoji Shopping Street (370m)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAPPORO DOME: 6.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR MIYAGI STADIUM

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
The roof that covers the seated spectators of the Miyagi stadium was designed to evoke the images of a crescend moon orned by the helmet of Date Masamune – a 16th century feudal lord who reigned over an area that includes the current Miyagi prefecture. The site is located in the city of Rifu in the Miyagi prefecture, and is mainly used for athletics competitions and football games. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 40-1, Date, Sugaya, Rifu-cho, Miyagi-gun, Miyagi
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Football

Hotel Route Inn Sendaiizumi Inter

  • ADDRESS: 2-3-9 Oosawa, Izumi-ku, Sendai, Sendai, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sendai Izumi Premium Outlet (3.39km)
  • DISTANCE FROM MIYAGI STADIUM: 9.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Smile Hotel Shiogama

  • ADDRESS: 18-31 Shintomi-cho Shiogama-city Miyagi-pref. JAPAN, Shiogama, Matsushima, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM MIYAGI STADIUM: 7.9km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Sendai Royal Park Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 6-2-1Teraoka, Izumi-ku, Sendai, Sendai, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Sendai Izumi Premium Outlet (150m)
  • DISTANCE FROM MIYAGI STADIUM: 13.1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR IBARAKI KASHIMA STADIUM

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Located in Kashima City, Ibaraki Prefecture, the Ibaraki Kashima Stadium is a dedicated football stadium with a natural grass pitch and excellent views from all seats. The stadium is home to the Japanese professional football team, Kashima Antlers. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 26-2, Ushiroyama, Jinkoji, Kashima-shi, Ibaraki
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Football

Comfort Inn Kashima

  • ADDRESS: 2-1-23 Horiwari, Kamisu, Kamisu, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM IBARAKI KASHIMA STADIUM: 7.6km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Itako Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 1-10-7 Ayame, Itako-shi, Ibaraki Prefecture, Itako, Itako, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM IBARAKI KASHIMA STADIUM: 11.4km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

New Makomo Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 100-15,Itako,Ibaraki,Japan, Itako, Itako, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM IBARAKI KASHIMA STADIUM: 11.7km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

HOTELS NEAR SAITAMA STADIUM

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
This stadium, located in Saitama City, Saitama Prefecture, is the largest dedicated football stadium in Japan and one of the largest in Asia. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 2-1, Misono, Midori-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Football

Toyoko Inn Urawa-misono-eki Higashi-guchi

  • ADDRESS: 4-7-1 Misono, Midori-ku, Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Hikawa Nyotai Shrine (3.28km)
  • DISTANCE FROM SAITAMA STADIUM: 1.5km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Hotel Sun Clover Koshigaya Eki mae

  • ADDRESS: Akayama Honcho 3-5, Koshigaya, Koshigaya, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM SAITAMA STADIUM: 7.3km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Hotel Sunoak

  • ADDRESS: Akayama Honcho 3-5, KoshigMinamikoshigaya 1-22-1, Koshigaya, Koshigaya, Japan
  • DISTANCE FROM SAITAMA STADIUM: 8.2km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

HOTELS NEAR INTERNATIONAL STADIUM YOKOHAMA (NISSAN STADIUM)

hotels near tokyo 2020 summer olympics venues
Located in Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, this multi-purpose sports stadium boasts a seating capacity for 72,327 spectators – the largest of any stadium in Japan. Photo and description by tokyo2020.org
  • ADDRESS: 3300, Kozukuecho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa
  • SPORT TO BE PLAYED HERE: Football

Hotel Grassino Urban Resort

  • ADDRESS: Kohoku-ku Shinyokohama 1-20-1 , Yokohama, Yokohama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum (580m)
  • DISTANCE FROM INTERNATIONAL STADIUM YOKOHAMA: 350m
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com

Daiwa Roynet Hotel Shin-Yokohama

  • ADDRESS: 3-17-1 Shinyokohama, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Yokohama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum (310m)
  • DISTANCE FROM INTERNATIONAL STADIUM YOKOHAMA: 1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Shin Yokohama Prince Hotel

  • ADDRESS: 3-4 Shin Yokohama, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Yokohama, Japan
  • NEAREST LANDMARK: Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum (460m)
  • DISTANCE FROM INTERNATIONAL STADIUM YOKOHAMA: 1,1km
  • Check availability, rates, and reviews in Agoda.com or Booking.com

Instagram Travel Influencer Takes a Break: Traveling #NotForTheGram

By basic definition, an Instagram travel “micro-influencer” is someone who has more than 10,000 followers. As much as I hate being labeled as one, I am an Instagram micro-influencer because I have 13.5k Instagram followers. However, I’d like to be known as a “travel influencer” because that’s what my Instagram account was all about. I would admit, it was a dream which I made happen after around 2-ish years of hard work.

I started a free WordPress blog back in mid-2017 after earning my Master’s Degree in International Studies. My daily routine has always been to focus on my government job in the morning and attend classes at night. Therefore, finishing graduate school has left a huge hole in my daily routine. Travel blogging filled that up. Moreover, it has really been my passion to travel, write, and take photographs. Hence, I decided to give travel blogging a try as a hobby. I also created an Instagram account where I post my travel photos. Moreover, I spent years doing research, engaging with the travel community, and learning how travel bloggers shoot their photos. I applied these on my Instagram, I hit 10,000 followers my articles climbed up the Google search results.

That’s it. I’m officially an Instagram travel “influencer”.

Aside from the ‘swipe up’ function privilege on my Instagram stories, gaining 10,000 followers has led me to countless opportunities. Brands were offering me sample products and services (and sometimes money) in exchange for Instagram posts and articles. I also got invited to events, and admittedly it upped my self-esteem game. This was already what I’ve dreamed of, right?

Things were really going well in general (I’m still gaining more and more followers). I know how to take that Instagrammable photos better. I’m starting to gain respect, especially from the Southast Asia travel community. But when my blog’s second birthday came, I decided to ‘take a break’ from my travel influencer Instagram.

There are some parts of being a travel influencer on Instagram which I can’t take anymore.

Spending too much time on my Instagram travel influencer page takes a toll on my mental health

Achieving 13.5k followers took me hours of reading and studying how other Instagram travel influencers did it. Gaining such status also meant constantly being on Instagram and engaging with the community.

I’ve virtually met other travel bloggers and Instagram influencers asking tips from me on how I did it. I also met fans who sent me appreciation messages saying that I inspire them to travel. Also, there were people I personally know who unfollowed me. I guess they were getting sick and alienated of my posts. I also get random “Hi”s and spam messages from strangers.

Worse, I myself would still get envious of other people who were currently traveling while I scroll my feed. I saw a classmate who has been traveling frequently and I got envious when I saw that she’s in Taiwan! Like, man, I’ve already been there! Why? And then that’s it. This is no longer healthy. And to tell you the truth, Instagram has ruined some of my relationships with people I value the most. It was a long story and there is no turning back. But, all I can do is to just pick up the pieces and start over.

On aggressiveness and being competitive and unstoppable

My personality has always been competitive and unstoppable (My life mantra is “What Sherlyn wants, Sherlyn gets.”). Therefore I consider travel influencing as a competitive thing where I need to be number one. I always find ways to step up my game. Travel bloggers older than me have become established but they started it around 10 years ahead of me. I am aggressive enough and do whatever it takes to steal the spotlight from them. Finally, I asked myself, “Is it really worth it? What would I get from this? Money, fame, free stuff, validation?” Seriously, who doesn’t want all of these, right? Taking a break was the only way I know to slow myself down. I also want reassess the real purpose of everything I want to do and achieve.

Let’s face it. On Instagram travel influencing, the more skin is out there, the more likes you’ll get.

People want to celebrate self-love. People get confident if they see confidence. On the other hand, there are really just sex predators lurking around the virtual world. They will like all the bikini photos they see.

I had a random medical check-up and the doctor pointed out all the causes of my chief health complaints to stress, and advised me to exercise. I started hitting the gym. I seriously worked hard for that curves and abs as much as I aspire to be more physically and mentall healthy. Then I went to Palawan for a holiday, that was the first time I wore bikini. I posted a photo on Instagram. True enough, it garnered so many likes compared to my breathtaking photos of the mountains and the ocean. Also, I got comments like “hot”, “sexy”, and all those words. It might mean good or bad, depending on who said it.

Two years later, occasional bikini snaps would effortlessly give me more than a thousand likes. On the other hand, a beautiful temple photo in Myanmar could only have 300+ likes. One of my blogger friends asked me how do I work on getting more engagement on Instagram. I told her, “Babygirl, you just gotta post some hot bikini photos.”. Which she actually did, for the love of Instagram engagement! *laughing my *ss off*

Wearing a bikini is something I’m not absolutely comfortable with because I still have body issues. But it indeed makes me celebrate my body and its imperfections. But Instagram saying that I should wear more bikinis to remain in the spotlight is something I will not do. I mean, NatGeo could have instead noticed the beautiful sceneries and local portrait photos I took in Cambodia, Thailand, and Myanmar, right? Does that mean I’m still not good enough? Maybe I need more photography practice.

Instagram travel influencing was my creative outlet, but it made me lose my creativity at the same time.

I always want to celebrate my travels. Thus, I experiement on how my photos would look good together when placed side by side in a grid. I did a combination of black and whites, colorful, pastel-ish, and moody. But seeing other Instagrammers maintaining a specific theme on their feeds, I really felt the pressure of doing so. Before my current travel influencer Instagram account, I had countless attempts on creating different accounts. That included black and white, pastel-themed, purely landscape photos, cinematic filters, you name it. However I realized it’s gonna limit the photos I could post and I want to post everything. Eventually, I resorted to a colorful, #nofilter, highly-saturated edits, and people liked it.

But it still limited the photos I could upload. A clean white museum photo could not fit in my feed, nor an old black temple photo. Perhaps these photos could sit somewhere in the middle of my feed and will not be noticed by anyone. However as I scroll my feed and see those photos, I see dents to my perfectly-curated feed and I’m not happy with it. Moreover, seeing everyone using Lightroom presets makes me feel out of place, but I want to make my photos as real as possible. And that’s when, ladies and gentlemen, Instagram somehow ruined my creativity.

Traveling With the Wrong People

I have also traveled with some people who literally travel and willing to die for that Instagrammable photos. Being a solo traveler and taking my own photos was really hard as shit, and I will be happy to have someone to take photos of me. Some people I traveled with would check out Instagram photos taken in that specific spot we’re in (a museum, a building, or a street) and will literally copy how other people did it. While I don’t agree with what they were practicing, I gave it a try. And to be fair, I got a couple of nice photos which looked good on my feed. But I want my own unique pose and angles and I don’t want to be just like everybody else.

Am I really an Instagram “Travel Influencer”? What do I really influence?

I always feel some dopamine rush whenever people would tell me that I inspire them to travel, whenever people would reach out to me and ask for recommendations (Hmmm I think this is a potential travel consultancy gig hehehe), and whenever people would also go to where I go, use the brands I feature or mention (both sponsored and not sponsored). Having more than 10,000 followers is something that most brands consider “influential” enough that if I post their product and be seen by my followers, they have already reached their desired audience.

Some brands would reach out to me and ask to post photos with their products and will give me complimentary samples and even money, and that’s it, but sometimes the amount would depend on how many likes the post would get. Other brands would ask me to promote their services and I will only get an income once I made a sale by using the discount codes I provide. Online shops, travel agencies, and hotel booking companies started reaching out to me. Being a travel influencer, I have been promoting them on my Instagram and blog like crazy (hoping at least a hundred out of my 13.5k followers would patronize the products and services), but guess what, I can’t even make them use my damn promo code!

I’m not really sure how it works. The greatest number of likes I’ve garnered in a single post so far is around 1,700 (but then again I have 13,500 followers, so around 11,800 don’t really like my post?). Not to mention I never bought followers and these people followed me in their own free will, and I can’t figure out what’s wrong.

Can’t Even Sell My Own Bags!

Upon checking my stats, More than 50% of my followers came from the Philippines (that’s around more than 7,000 people), so perhaps if I sell any physical product, some would buy it. And then I started launching a travel and food-themed canvas tote bag business. My products have cute designs and were commended by so many people. However, they just won’t buy a goddamn bag. Take note, I only sell them for USD5! And then it hit me. There must be something I’m doing or not doing and I really have to figure this shit out because it’s already wasting my time and money.

Influencer marketing companies target the wrong influencers, and some manipulate the hell out of influencers’ content

Along with travel-related brands which reached out to me are brands that aren’t totally or at least directly connected to travel: make-up brands, cooking ingredients, drugstores, candies, home decors, name it. At first, I tend to accept all projects and say to myself, “This is just gonna be one non-travel-related photo on my feed and it can just get buried eventually, plus it’s money, so let’s do this!”. At first it wasn’t hard, you just have to follow the required elements of the photos by the brand, like the product name should be visible, you should be using the product, the caption should be like this and like that, etc. There were brands who will give you full liberty and will not pre-approve your posts, and preserves the creativity of the influencer.

However, there will be brands which will dictate every aspect of how you should take the photo and write the caption and it sometimes no longer aligns with my personal brand. I am obviously an Instagram travel influencer, and if it’s a brand not related to travel, I will naturally at least do my best to still link it to travel, right? But some PR companies do not get this. I mean, why would they approach me in the first place with their non-travel related brands. I had to turn down and stop participating in these types of campaigns because it was getting too toxic.

A Bad Experience With An Influencer Marketing Company

In fact, there was one PR company who yelled at me over the phone and explained things one by one and detail by detail in a very high-pitched derogatory manner as if I’m dumb (Excuse me, you’re talking to a University Professor with a Master’s Degree in a top university in the world! But of course, all she knows is that I am an “influencer” who did not meet her photo criteria). Oh, the photo, it’s gonna pay me just USD10 and this is for a big credit card company! Not to mention they had to made me wait for 2 weeks for the approval of my post only to reject it. On a brighter side, a popular sneaker company paid me thousands of dollars and three pairs of sneakers for 2 Instagram posts on my travel influencer account. Now this is the real deal.

Ideally, I want to work with travel-related brands and companies, like travel agencies, airlines, transportation companies, tourism boards, travel gear companies, travel websites, among others. With my self-esteem issues forever creeping in, I don’t think I’m big enough to work with them. At least not yet. Let’s see where it goes after I undergo a major overhaul.

Pitching proposals to brands made me feel like I’m “begging” for free stuff, and it doesn’t feel right.

This is not in any way to connote a negative notion on pitching, but this is what it felt like.

When I was still a small blogger with less than 10,000 followers and a free WordPress account, I had the audacity to pitch to brands because I was aggressive and unstoppable like that. Not-so-suprisingly, there were restaurants, hotels, and hostels around Manila and nearby provinces who believed in the power of micro-influencer marketing and won’t bother giving free meals and free accommodations to me in exchange for Instagram posts on my travel influencer account and blog articles. It really has a value because the content is going to be out there forever, accessible to everyone who wants to know about the business.

I believe this has been a tradition that the travel blogging community has been doing, and big-time travel bloggers tell everyone to not get discouraged by rejections and no responses. I was very insensitive about these, but there were incidents where businesses would even bully and bash these Instagram travel influencers instead of politely rejecting them. That included me. I have a very polished media kit and a professionally-written letter with complete information and details, but I got an undesirable disrespectful response instead of a nice rejection. For a time it discouraged me and hurt me, because if being disrespected for offering marketing services will be the price of a meal in a mid-range casual dining restaurant, then it’s not worth it.

Good Experiences With Brands and Bridging Relationships With People

Meanwhile, I had good encounters with business owners who kept in touch with me even after the project and even became my friends and part of my professional network. Them being more than nice and appreciative of my services, I endlessly promote their businesses in my social media and I don’t mind if they no longer gonna give me something in return for that. Despite that, I want to improve the quality of my photos and articles first and let the brands come to me more than I pitch to them. Other bigger bloggers tell me to just keep doing what I’m doing and the opportunities will eventually come. I’m still wishing and working hard for it!

I can no longer enjoy traveling the way I used to because of the pressures from my Instagram travel influencer page.

On the initial stages of my travel life, I did not really have enough photos. Sometimes I go home only bringing a few photos of my lunch or a non-spectacular street photo showing the gloomy weather condition in the place I went to. I talked to and learned a lot from so many people I met along the way but never exchanged contact details nor took a photo with them (because to me, the world is big and people really come and go). But all the stories and memories are inside my heart which I always share with my friends and loved ones.

And when my travel blogging dreams started, that’s when I stepped up the game. I was constantly on my Instagram travel influencer account trying to learn how these girls in long dresses take and edit their beautiful photos, including where they went and where could be a good spot to take Instagrammable photos. And then I joined the bandwagon. I bought nice swimsuits, cute and colorful skirts, and carefully plan my outfits vis-a-vis the places I will visit (yes, even if the clothes are weather-inappropriate and uncomfortable).

I will sometimes feel really down if I wore ordinary clothes or if my clothes did not match the place. Worse, in the name of having beautiful photos of me for Instagram, I will wake up really early. Or I will patiently wait for people to disperse for me to get a shot of myself with no people. I still visit museums and learn about the places’ culture. But sometimes I was just too focused on getting the right shot in a beautiful place. I forgot to consider talking to the locals and even trying out local food.

“If it’s not on Instagram, it did not happen.”

There was one time, the moment I landed in Cebu, I first went to the mall to buy some toiletries. I decided to videocall one of my friends saying I safely landed and I am planning to take less photos. Then he said, “Why? It’s not a real proof that you actually went there! They could just assume you stole the photo somewhere. Your Instagram should be you and the view! Also, if it’s not on Instagram, it never happened, right?”

Every word he said got me questioning about the real essence of traveling. Am I doing this for myself to grow and gain more experiences and learn more things about life? Or am I only doing this just for Instagram? Guilty as charged, sometimes I only go visit a restaurant to get a nice photo even if the food is not good and crazy expensive at the same time. Or go to a place and risk my safety just to get that perfect shot. I am becoming that kind of person already and I don’t really like it.

Traveling NOT for Instagram

Meanwhile, I met some people who did not even care if they took enough photos from a trip. I really admired them. I met a backpacker in a hostel in Cebu whom after going to Oslob, lost all his photos. His phone won’t turn on either. I felt sad for him and offered to accompany him to have his phone repaired. He told me to not worry too much about it. He said, “It’s all in here (pointing to his temple to mean all the memories are on his mind anyway)”. I answered, “And here (placing my heart on my chest to mean all memories are in his heart as well)”. It was a dramatic scene there but I felt it really hard and it hit me.

Moreover, I have an American friend who went around Manila and El Nido and then I checked his Instagram. I saw he posted an ugly photo of a black bird in a cage, and I was mocking him. I said, “That’s it? That’s all you can post after seeing a lot of beautiful stuff here in my country?” And he told me he has gone to so many places already. However, I would never see them on his Instagram. Now that’s real travel.

The purpose of my Instagram influencer travel page is to share my travel experiences to the world, but it feels so fake sometimes.

One of my favorite quotes by the late Anthony Bourdain was this:

“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.”

Anthony Bourdain

Of course, nothing in this world is absolutely beautiful. Traveling also could get really awful sometimes. Delayed flights, ruined sleep patterns, people who will hit on you, non-aligning preferences with your travel companions. Also, getting ripped off a huge amount of money in tourist sites, weather disturbances, annoying people, and so much more. But no one posts these on Instagram. I mean who likes an ugly face, an ugly photo with an ugly story on Instagram? Each and everyone’s Instagram feed is meant to celebrate the good life and things that make us happy. Thus, there’s no room for ugly stuff.

But no one has to know whether you had a crazy vacation with the wrong travel companion in Indonesia. Whether you had a scary encounter with a stranger in Singapore. That time when some hotel staff yelled at you in Vietnam when you did not know what you did wrong. Whether you mistakenly booked a crappy and creepy hotel in Cambodia. That time when some airport staff in Brunei has been consistently rude to you everytime you exit the country. Whether some locals in Hong Kong would shoo you away if you ask them for directions in English.

The Ugly Side of Traveling

These are some ugly side of traveling that you just don’t want to share. It’s because people might get turned off, judge you, bash you for being judgmental and ethnocentric, among others. And I don’t want to spread fear, judgment and bad vibes either. So, I would rather share only the good stuff, but it feels so fake and uncomfortable on my part. Photos might look beautiful but the context and the moments behind that were not really beautiful. I want to be transparent to my followers but I don’t want to disappoint them at the same time. Hence I think Instagram is not the best place for that. 

No one really cares if you will be away from Instagram. People will just go on with their lives. Your follower count is nothing but a number.

Because of all the reasons stated above, I decided to give Instagram a break (well, not really. I still want to celebrate my travels in a more low-key, non-income-based, non-likes-based way, hence I created this account. I posted both an Instagram story and an Instagram feed post on my travel influencer account announcing my break. There, I asked my followers that they can leave their emails if they still want to get in touch. Guess what, only a handful of people expressed their sadness and intent to keep in touch. The rest, they never cared! Not even my own family and inner circle of friends. I reached out to those people who ‘care’ by sliding them a DM. I let them know about my other Instagram account and they really did follow me there.

It feels better to be surrounded by a few people who really care about you. To tell you the truth, Having 13.5k followers still leave me lonely and empty on most of the days. Do their follows and likes really mean anything? Can you count on them if some crisis happen to you without them judging? I don’t think so. 

Takeaway

Now, I am giving Instagram travel influencing a break. I will try to have travels which are less Instagram-motivated and I want to see what happens. This time I will no longer care about the likes and validation. I just want to celebrate my travels and writing and photography are the two things that make me happy. I will no longer care about the income and all the perks. At least for now.

After all, I have a full-time job with a decent income which allows me to see places. I’ll focus on that first. After all, if I keep on improving my travel writing and photography, I can eventually get noticed by brands. That includes airline companies, National Geographic, The Travel Channel, CNN, tourism boards, and luxury hotels. Who knows? But as of now, I just want to focus on my (real) job, (real) friends, and the (real) world, and be as real as possible.

For more drama, here are other articles for you:

How To Be a Travel Blogger This 2020 (9 Tips)

How to be a travel blogger this 2020
How to be a travel blogger this 2020?

So you want to be a travel blogger? Traveling to places, getting sponsorships and exchange deals, posting breathtaking photos and writing meaningful captions and articles on social media, getting likes and praises, earning, and the cycle continues. Ahhhhh. Welcome to the good life. That’s typically the world of a travel blogger. But the question is, how to be a travel blogger this 2020?

In this era when almost everyone can travel anywhere given several airline promo deals, the entry of cheap hostel-type accommodations in the hospitality industry, and the rapid flow of information which allows anyone to create and follow his own itinerary, the cost of traveling became really, really cheaper. Therefore, everyone is posting their travel photos and stories in social media, and hence can be potential travel bloggers.

However, not everyone is explorative about the business of blogging and how to create your own brand in the travel niche.

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I was among those people who was so passionate about travel and want to make a business out of it. But let me tell you this now: How to be a travel blogger this 2020? It does not happen overnight. I myself have been blogging for more than a year now, but I still have a lot of things to learn. Of course, I really want to continue what I’m doing with the hope that one day I can be a digital nomad who travels for a living like the others.

I’m not (yet) an expert on this, but for starters here are some of the things you have to do or consider on how to be a travel blogger this 2020:

1. Just start! And invest

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For newbies, almost everything has to start from scratch, right? So create that WordPress or Blogger account, right now! But before that, you have to think of a name that will suite your niche/theme. Since mine is a travel blog and I want to instill an impression to my readers and followers that I am always away, so they have to check my blog or Instagram stories to know where I’m at. My co-workers and friends then started to call me by my Instagram username, @wheressherlyn!

With investing I don’t exactly mean it in a purely financial sense. I actually started with a free WordPress blog, so I came from a wheressherlyn.wordpress.com domain before I bought my own ‘digital real estate’ in the world of blogging. The point is, if you might be doing this as a hobby, then you could completely do it for free!

What you have to invest at this point are effort, consistency, and time. Blogging takes a lot of your time. You’ll find yourself always brainstorming with yourself over so many ideas. Eventually you have to invest money on it. After all, nothing in this world comes for free these days, right?

So rule number one on how to be a travel blogger: You need to have your eyes on the prize and hustle hard to achieve it!

2. Look for inspirations, but try to be unique

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Sure, there are a lot of established and successful travel bloggers out there, and some of them came to the point that they quit their day jobs already to pursue travel blogging full-time. It is good to get inspiration from their accounts – what they write, how they take photos, and how they market their respective brands.

You could take off from that, but if everyone else is writing an itinerary on a specific city with the same destinations, what makes you different from them? You have to stand out and be different. Maybe you could explore off-the-beaten paths, or write on something about a place that has no write-up so far. If someone Googles about it, no other results would come up first but yours!

So, rule number two on how to be a travel blogger this 2020: be unique and stand out!

3. Identify your niche

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Okay so now you have settled that you want to have a travel blog, you have to identify a specific niche. This will make you target the right kind of audience for your content. You have to clear about the specific part of travel you want to focus on. Are you into (1) Instagram-worthy places, (2) food crawls, (3) cultural appreciation trips, (4) budget travel/luxury travel, (5) solo/couple/family travel, etc. The choices are endless.

You don’t have to choose only one. It can be a combination of different niches. In my case, since I teach history, I want to provide history trivia to my readers. I also want to provide tips on where to eat and where to stay, and what are the Instagrammable places in the places I visit.

So rule number three on how to be a travel blogger this 2020, get to know yourself, your brand, and identity as a blogger in a deeper sense.

4. Keep your content as authentic as possible

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Some readers get turned off whenever they see contents that happen to be sponsored or turn out to be an advertisement. Blogging is a business, and bloggers need income-generating mechanisms to maintain their websites and fund their travels to produce more content, hence this is just normal. Most bloggers accept partnership with brands they really patronize so that they can be as authentic as possible in creating content for their readers and followers. It’s okay to write sponsored content, but make sure you will be as real as you can, and if possible, I encourage you to partner with brands that align with your niche.

Rule number four on how to be a travel blogger this 2020, identify your (future) clients!

5. Engage and network with other travel bloggers

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In this business, networking is a must. You can work with your blog alone, yes, but hearing from the experts and more experienced travel bloggers could contribute in clarifying your direction for your blog. You can even get insider tips on how to gain followers, land sponsorships, how to pursue full-time blogging, etc. This has been very useful to me in growing my blog and Instagram because engaging with other bloggers helped me in so many aspects. The blogging community operates in a spirit of cooperation, it is not a competition. So don’t be afraid to reach out to bigger names, after all, they can be your new BFFs.

6. Be consistent

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Once you start your blog, you have to continue producing content to keep your existence and grow your brand. There are a lot of new travel bloggers on a daily basis, and the key to institutionalizing yourself is to be consistent. I committed a huge mistake when I suddenly lost interest with blogging after 6 months of starting it, and how I felt like I got left behind and there are more bloggers now out there. Try as much as possible to produce new up-to-date contents periodically, depending on how much time you have. It will eventually grow, trust me. Consistency is the key.

Since I am blogging on top of a full-time job, I wrote about my typical day as a blogger and 20-something Professor.

7. Always try to learn new things

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Blogging and the business of blogging is not limited to just taking photos and writing articles to be posted in your blog. If you want to make it big, you have to learn other things such as basic HTML and CSS, photo editing, SEO, digtial marketing, social media engagement, and the like. But don’t get intimidated. Google and YouTube are your bestfriends. Literally everything is there for you to learn, for free!

8. Consider creating social media accounts to promote your blog

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Now that you have posted contents from your blog, it’s time to increase its exposure and readership by creating social media accounts of your blog. In my case, I created instagram.com/wheressherlyn to promote my blog, and surprisingly, it grew really fast – faster than my blog! It depends on your objectives and target audience, but you can also create Facebook pages, Twitter account, etc.

You can also follow my Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts.

9. Blog for the right reasons

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Lastly, the moment you start blogging, don’t think too far and look forward to earning 6-digit income monthly like the ones you see in the internet. While it’s true, these established bloggers worked so hard to reach that far. But you can, too! But first you have to tell yourself that you want to blog because it is your passion to share your experiences to the world, and opportunities will eventually come, trust me!

How to be a travel blogger this 2020? Are you ready to become one?

So, are you already inspired enough and convinced to be a travel blogger this 2020? Good luck and happy blogging! You can always hit me up for questions, just send me a DM at instagram.com/wheressherlyn.

For sample travel articles to help you inspired to get started, refer to this link: https://www.sherlynmaehernandez.com/archives